Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Date -- 1880s (Remove)
Places -- Other States (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 25 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Worrall watercolor

Worrall, Henry

This promotional watercolor of Kansas scenes was painted by artist Henry Worrall for the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). It is believed that Worrall painted the poster for the Kansas chapter of the WCTU to use at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition held in New Orleans in 1884. The poster depicts Topeka and various types of Kansas iconography.

previewthumb

Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

previewthumb

Charles M. Sheldon to Theodore W. Peers

Sheldon, Charles Monroe, 1857-1946

Charles M. Sheldon wrote to the Chairman of Trustees of the Central Congregational Church, Theodore W. Peers, accepting the position of pastor.

previewthumb

Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

previewthumb

Dr. Martha Cunningham

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, one of the first female doctors to practice in Kansas. Martha was born on January 1, 1854, in Greencastle, Indiana. She moved to Kansas with her parents, in 1865, to a farm near Birch Swith, four miles southwest of Garnett, Kansas. She taught school for a few years before devoting her life to the medical profession. In 1886, Cunningham graduated from the Women's Division of the Chicago School of Medicine. She practiced for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community.

previewthumb

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

previewthumb

Dodge City Cowboy Band, St. Louis, Missouri

A studio portrait of the Dodge City Cowboy Band at the First National Convention of Cattlemen in St. Louis, Missouri. Pictured are: Back row: unknown, unknown, L.A. Lauber, J.S. Welsh, Charles Otero, unknown, Roy Drake; Middle row: Prof. Eastman, Prof. Miller, George [illegible], unknown, unknown, unknown, Frank Warren; Seated: Chalk Beeson, George Horder, William Visquesney.

previewthumb

Henry Kuhn collection letterpress books

Kuhn, Henry, 1830-1900

Copies of correspondence both received and sent by Captain Henry Kuhn dating from after the Civil War until shortly before his death in 1898. Some of the letters are illegible. Much of the correspondence regards Kuhn's banking and other financial interests, particularly in Leavenworth, as well as other business and personal affairs, including during his time as an Indian agent in the Oklahoma area. Kuhn was county surveyor and township clerk in Atchison County, Indian agent in the Indian territory, publisher of a Marion County newspaper, and was otherwise a prominent Kansas citizen of the nineteenth century.

previewthumb

Samuel Forster Tappan

A portrait of Samuel Forster Tappan, who was born in Massachusetts and came to Kansas when he was in his twenties. He listed his occupation as a journalist but was best known as secretary at the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional conventions. He was a free state supporter and settled in Lawrence. This image was taken a number of years after the territorial era.

previewthumb

Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas

Merritt & Van Wagner

Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, seated in a horse drawn carriage in front of a residence, Washington D.C.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Date -- 1880s

Places -- Other States

Date

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation