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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown

Medlar

A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Andrieus A. Jones to Edmund G. Ross

Ross, Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson), 1826-1907

Jones acknowledges receipt of copies of Ross's history of the presidential impeachment trial and will share it with leading Democrats in Chicago during the campaign convention.

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XIT mess wagon, Channing, Texas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

Members of the XIT ranch's round-up crew seated on the ground eating a meal near the chuckwagon. Also visible in the photograph are rolled up canvasses and horses. The XIT was the largest outfit in the United States, with 2 million acres of pasture land. This 1897 photograph was taken on the trail near their headquarters in Buffalo Springs, Texas.

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Fred Tainter's ranch in Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of Fred Tainter's chuckwagon with cowboys seated on the ground eating a meal. Also visible are horses and a herd of cattle in the background.

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Dr. Martha Cunningham, Garnett, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, seated in the buggy, with her sister Belle. The buggy is in front of her office at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Oak Street in Garnett, Kansas. A graduate from the Chicago School of Medicine, Martha and her reliable horse Prince made house calls for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community. Her name and office hours are on the door in the background.

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Dr. Martha Cunningham

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, one of the first female doctors to practice in Kansas. Martha was born on January 1, 1854, in Greencastle, Indiana. She moved to Kansas with her parents, in 1865, to a farm near Birch Swith, four miles southwest of Garnett, Kansas. She taught school for a few years before devoting her life to the medical profession. In 1886, Cunningham graduated from the Women's Division of the Chicago School of Medicine. She practiced for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community.

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Dodge City Cowboy Band on a round-up

View of men, some of whom are members of the Dodge City Cowboy Band, on a round-up in Indian Territory. Visible are a chuck wagon (with "L. N. York C.O.D." written on its canvas cover), men on horseback, dogs, the Dodge City Cowboy Band with their instruments, and a herd of cattle in the background.

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Dodge City Cowboy Band, St. Louis, Missouri

A studio portrait of the Dodge City Cowboy Band at the First National Convention of Cattlemen in St. Louis, Missouri. Pictured are: Back row: unknown, unknown, L.A. Lauber, J.S. Welsh, Charles Otero, unknown, Roy Drake; Middle row: Prof. Eastman, Prof. Miller, George [illegible], unknown, unknown, unknown, Frank Warren; Seated: Chalk Beeson, George Horder, William Visquesney.

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"Three Block" cowboys going on cattle watch at night

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of Three Block ranch cowboys preparing to go on the second guard duty to watch cattle at night. Visible in the photograph, taken with a flash, are cowboys getting ready for guard duty, and others going to bed next to a chuckwagon.

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