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Date -- 1890s (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 42 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Theodosius Botkin

Downing, George

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was taken in Topeka, Kansas, when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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Theodosius Botkin

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was possibly taken in Hutchinson, Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

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Advertisement for Summerfield & Jacobs in Lawrence, Kansas

Atkinson, J. T.

This is an advertisement for M. Summerfield and George J. Jacobs, Attorneys at Law, 77 Massachusetts Street in Lawrence, Kansas. It is published in the Lawrence City Directory, 1871, page 116.

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William F.Rightmire

This is a portrait of William F. Rightmire, an attorney, who came to Kansas in 1887, and practiced law in Larned, Cottonwood Falls, and Topeka. In 1888, he was nominated by the Union-Labor Party of Kansas as its attorney general candidate. Two years later in 1890, Rightmire was nominated as the People's Party candidate for Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas

A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.

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Wallace business directory, Wallace, Kansas

This photograph shows a framed display board labeled, "Wallace, the Metropolis of Western Kansas. Directory of the thoroughly reliable business houses." There are 17 businesses advertised on the display, and many of the advertisement also contain photographs of the business buildings. Businesses listed include: Robert M. Auchard, Land, Loan and Insurance Agent; Peter Robidoux, Pioneer Merchant of Wallace; Felix T. Gandy, Real Estate Broker; Forker and McQuiston, Fresh and Salt Meats; Charles H. Musser, Sheet Metalware, Pumps, Stoves, Tinware, Iron pipe and fitting; Wallace County Register; Merchants Bank of Wallace; W. A. Oetzer, Druggist and Pharmacist; C. M. Henkel, Watchmaker and Jeweler; J. R. Hanger, Popular Barber Shop; B. I. Look and Company, Dry Goods and Clothing; A. J. Phillips, Fresh and Salt Meats; J. W. Dilworth, Grocery Headquarters; Law and Land Office; Dr. J. Haggart, Physician and Surgeon; Caufman and Coburn, Livery, Feed, and Sale Stables; and The Albany House.

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Gasper Christopher Clemens

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life whom were believed to be falsely accused or denied their personal rights. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One of those positions was legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling, and the other as court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and to organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After his defeat, Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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Eugene Fitch Ware

Portrait of Eugene Fitch Ware, "Ironquill", a noted Kansas newspaperman, lawyer and poet. He is well known for his poem "Dewey Was the Morning".

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