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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 26 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The new chicken in the barnyard

Judge Magazine

This cartoon, from the cover of the satirical magazine Judge, illustrates the ?birth? of the Populist Party. Hovering over the chick (who has a banner on his straw hat labeled ?Farmer?s Alliance") is a rooster symbolizing the Republican Party, and a chicken, representing the Democratic Party. The subtitle reads, ?THE LITTLE CHICK (to old parties -- "You?re too big for me just now, 'tis true, but I?ll lick you both in ?92. Cock-a-doodle-doodle-doo!!?

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A. J. Arnold to Joseph Hebbard

Arnold, A. J.

In this brief but informative letter A. J. Arnold, a Topeka, Kansas, druggist, informs Joseph Hebbard, treasurer of the Farmer's Alliance, of his decision to switch his allegiance from the Democratic Party to the People's (Populist) Party. He is eager to "release the state of Kansas from the misrule of the Republican Party." While Arnold is confident that he has made the right decision, he also notes that many other Democrats are wavering. Consequently, Arnold has prepared a letter to the Democrats that expresses the benefits of supporting Populism; he asks Hebbard to read through the draft of this letter and provide comments. This enclosure is not with the original letter and has not been located.

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The Grangers' dream of cheap money

Puck

This political cartoon from the satirical Puck magazine illustrates the Republican perception of the People?s (Populist) Party belief in the coinage of silver and the redistribution of wealth to the masses. In the cartoon, Populist senator William Peffer uses a bellows to propel the windmill of the U.S. Treasury in order to pump out more ?greenbacks.? Outside the windmill, farmers are hungrily grabbing bags of money and carting them away in wagons. Billboards in the nearby town refer to the rapid inflation caused by the distribution of so much money.

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To the people of Kansas

Kansas. Legislature. House of Representatives

This brief statement by the Kansas Republican House of Representatives, led by George Douglass, was written during the Populist War of 1893 in order to affirm that the Republican Party stood for ?the supremacy of law and order against anarchy.? During this ?war,? the state had two houses -- the Populist (Dunsmore) House and the Republican (Douglass) House -- both of which claimed to have been the legally elected House of Representatives for the state. Initially the two houses had conducted their business side by side in Representative Hall, but on February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. Both sides stood at a standstill until February 25, when a decision from the Kansas Supreme Court stated that the Republican House was the legally elected representative body.

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Puppetmaster political cartoon

Ottawa Journal and Triumph

This political cartoon from the Ottawa Journal and Triumph, published in Franklin County, presents the Populist perspective on big business and its ties to the government. In the cartoon, a puppet master (with a hat that reads "corporations") controls five marionettes, labeled with official positions such as "major," "judge," and "governor." The largest marionette, at the center, is President Grover Cleveland.

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Populist members of the Dunsmore House at the Kansas Statehouse

Farrow, W. F.

This group picture, taken during or after the Legislative War of 1893, depicts the members of the Dunsmore House (Populist), and a few women and children, standing on the statehouse steps in Topeka, Kansas. The validity of the election of 1893 had been called in question, and thus two houses, the Douglass House (Republican) and Dunsmore House (Populist), both occupied Representative Hall and claimed to be the legally elected legislative body. On February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. The Douglass House then recruited six hundred guards (called sergeants-at-arms) to guard the hall, refusing an order from Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to vacate the premises. Finally, on the night of February 16, the ousted Populists agreed to wait for the verdict from the Supreme Court while the Republicans maintained control of the House, and on February 25, the Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House. This event, although it lasted only twelve days, came to be known as the Legislative War or the Populist War.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas

Merritt & Van Wagner

Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, seated in a horse drawn carriage in front of a residence, Washington D.C.

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The poor donkey has too many drivers

Judge Magazine

In this political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge, Populist senators William Peffer and ?Sockless? Jerry Simpson push a boulder (symbolizing the Farmer?s Alliance) under the wheel of a wagon that represents the United States. In the driver?s seat are five congressmen, each with their own agenda labeled on their sash. The wagon is being pulled by a donkey signifying ?democracy.? Judge magazine, created by artists who had allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881 and its sales eventually surpassed those of its rival, Puck.

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Between Millstones

Kelly, H. B.

This short pamphlet discusses the problems that high tariffs and the gold standard create for workers and farmers. It clearly presents Populist ideas about the dire situation of Kansas farmers by giving several examples of how businessmen and merchants benefit from the oppression of common laborers. The pamphlet was written by H. B. Kelly and printed by the Jeffersonian Publishing Company in Lawrence, Kansas; each pamphlet cost five cents.

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