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Date -- 1900s (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 37 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Blood Smith

Uhl, S. Jerome

Oil portrait of Charles Blood Smith by artist Jerome S. Uhl. The subject was a prominent Topeka lawyer who started a firm with William H. Rossington in 1876. The artist was a painter from Cincinnati, Ohio, who studied in Paris, exhibited in Europe, and painted portraits of a number of prominent Americans.

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Wright's Dry Goods store, Columbus, Kansas

An exterior view of Wright's Dry Goods store owned by Isaac Wright, Columbus, Kansas. Employees and possibly customers are posed in the doorways of the business. On the second floor of the building is the law office of C. D. Ashley

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William Cather Hook

This is a portrait of William Cather Hook, who was born in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, on September 24, 1857, the son of Enos and Elizabeth (Inghram) Hook. The family came west and in 1867. They settled in Leavenworth, which became the family's permanent home. William Hook graduated from Leavenworth High School and then studied in the law office of Clough and Wheat. He later studied at St. Louis Law School, Law Department of Washington University, and graduated in 1878. After graduation, Hook became a member of the Lucian Baker law firm in Leavenworth. When Mr. Baker was elected to the United States Senate, the law firm of Baker, Hook and Atwood was formed. In 1899 William Hook was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Kansas. He was advanced to the bench of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1903, appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt. Judge Hook remained on the federal bench until his death on August 11, 1921.

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Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Washburn Law School, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the Washburn Law School in Topeka, Kansas. The school opened its doors on September 17, 1903 at 118 West Eight Street. In 1911, the school moved to 725-27 Kansas Avenue to accommodate increasing enrollment. Within two years the institution was moving once again after Washburn trustees agreed to purchase the Bell Telephone building at 211 West Sixth Avenue. This location was intended to be the permanent home for the law school but due to renovation problems, the school moved to the Washburn Campus, in 1918, and into the basement of Crane Observatory until future accommodations could be made. A bicycle is visible outside of the building.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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