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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 38 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Fremont Leidy

Rolfe & Colville

A portrait of Fremont Leidy, the son of Abram and Martha Leidy. He grew up on the family farm in Butler County, Kansas, attended high schools in Augusta and El Dorado, and graduated from Fort Scott Normal School in 1887. After graduation he accepted a position as principal at Severy Schools and two years later the superintendency of the Augusta schools. Three years later he entered law school at Kansas University and was admitted to practice in 1893. He opened an office at El Dorado where he practiced a short time. Health issues forced him to leave his law practice and he started a farm. In 1900 he was elected to the Kansas Senate, representing District 25 in Butler County and served for two years. Governor Stanley selected him as a member of the text-book commission. In 1908 he was reelected to the senate. On June 27, 1910, Leidy was appointed United State revenue collector for Kansas. He married Myrtle Jenkins on July, 1893 and they had three children: Pauline, Richard J., and Roger. Myrtle died on July 22, 1906 and he married A. Zota Martin on September 9, 1914.

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Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan

Long, Nelson

This is a photograph of Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan taken on their wedding day. Edward Ray Sloan later served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term.

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Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College

This is Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College, Holton, Kansas, where he received a degree of Bachelor of Laws. Edward Ray Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904; however, Campbell's program lasted only two years and the Kansas Board of Law Examiners required a three-year course before taking the bar exam, so he entered Washburn College law school and graduated in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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E.F. Reser

This is a portrait of E.F. Reser of Greensburg, Kansas. He was a Republican state representative of the 97th Dist., Kiowa County.

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Lewis Taylor Hussey

This black and white photograph shows Lewis Taylor Hussey, (1866-1954). Hussey, a native of Ohio, came to Kansas at the age of two with his family and settled near the town of Williamsburg, Kansas. He later moved to Lyndon, Kansas, in 1889, where he established his professional career as an insurance adjuster. Actively involved in his community, Hussey organized the Osage Fire Insurance Company and he held a number of political offices from the city clerk of Lyndon to the deputy register of deeds of Osage County. He also served as Lyndon's mayor before making a political bid in 1904 for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives. Hussey represented the Thirty-Fifth district for one term before his appointment in 1905 as the state's oil inspector. When he stepped down from the position in 1909, he continued to serve the state through a number of key political posts. In 1915, Governor Arthur Capper appointed Hussey to the position of state fire marshal. In 1923 he became the chairman of the Kansas Corporation Commission. Hussey's long and successful career as a public servant came to a close on December 29, 1954, when he passed away at the age of eighty-eight in Topeka, Kansas.

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James Frazier Legate

Leonard, J. H.

This cabinet card shows James Frazier Legate,(1829-1902). A politician from Leavenworth, Kansas, Legate began his political career in 1861, when he was elected to the first House of Representatives under the Wyandotte Constitution. The following year he was appointed the State Assessor for Kansas and was responsible for organizing the revenue services of the state. Legate's political career resumed in 1864, when he was elected to the Kansas Senate from the Twenty-Fourth District. He served one term in the Senate, 1865-1866, before his appointment as a Postal Agent for the U.S. Government, 1867-1868. Within two years, Legate was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives and served from 1871 to 1889.

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Samuel Crumbine poster

Public poster with Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine banning the public drinking cup, common roller towel, and encouraging the swatting of flies. Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine of Dodge City was one of the nation's leaders in the field of public health. He became secretary of the Kansas State Board of Health in 1904 and served for approximately 20 years. His public health campaigns were directed at practices and conditions that led to the spread of communicable diseases.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Gardner, R.G.

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865 to 1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee county's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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