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Date -- 1910s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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William L. Sayers in Hill City, Kansas

These two photographs show William L. Sayers, an attorney, in his office in Hill City, Kansas. Sayers was born around 1872 in Nebraska and moved to Hill City, Kansas, with his family in 1888. There at the age of 15 he earned a teaching certificate, however, he had to wait until he turned 16 to teach. After teaching school for several years, he became clerk of the court for Graham County. Sayers used his spare time to read law books. In 1893, he was admitted to the bar and took classes at the University of Kansas. Although he never graduated from law school, he was elected county attorney for Graham county in 1900, 1912, and 1914. His younger brother John followed him in this position in 1918. He was the second African American to be elected Graham County Attorney; the first was G. W. Jones who was elected in 1896. The Sayers brothers practiced law in Graham County for their entire careers.

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Wright's Dry Goods store, Columbus, Kansas

An exterior view of Wright's Dry Goods store owned by Isaac Wright, Columbus, Kansas. Employees and possibly customers are posed in the doorways of the business. On the second floor of the building is the law office of C. D. Ashley

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George W. Allison

This is a studio portrait of George W. Allison, an attorney in McPherson, Kansas.

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Theodosius Botkin

Dimock, S. W.

A portrait of Theodosius Botkin taken in Topeka, Kansas when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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Temperance history correspondence

This correspondence was sent and received by Frank M. Stahl, superintendent of the Kansas State Temperance Union. A letter from James K. Shields, state superintendent for the Anti-Saloon League of Illinois, asks for Stahl's assistance in recruiting Governor Walter R. Stubbs for a temperance rally in Springfield, Illinois, in opposition to the "United Societies boozers of Chicago." A letter from J. F. Baker, legislative superintendent for the Wisconsin Anti-Saloon League seeks information about prohibitory zones around Kansas universities as the state of Wisconsin attempts to exclude saloons from the college town of Madison. Correspondence with W. H. Edmundson and E. D. Mikesell, attorneys in Fredonia, regards the selling and prosecution of "Belgian Beer" which supposedly contained one-half of one percent of alcohol and was sold by children at lemonade stands. Stahl responded that "the internal revenue collectors have rather overstepped their duties." Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Washburn Law School, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the Washburn Law School in Topeka, Kansas. The school opened its doors on September 17, 1903 at 118 West Eight Street. In 1911, the school moved to 725-27 Kansas Avenue to accommodate increasing enrollment. Within two years the institution was moving once again after Washburn trustees agreed to purchase the Bell Telephone building at 211 West Sixth Avenue. This location was intended to be the permanent home for the law school but due to renovation problems, the school moved to the Washburn Campus, in 1918, and into the basement of Crane Observatory until future accommodations could be made. A bicycle is visible outside of the building.

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Harry Walter Colmery, as a young man.

This is a photographic portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The portrait of Colmery was taken as a young man.

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Harry Walter Colmery

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery (1890-1979) dressed in his World War I uniform. Colmery was an attorney in Topeka, Kansas, an American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights.

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A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-

Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.

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