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Date -- 1930s (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 23 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States

Portrait of Charles Curtis, 1860-1936, United States Congressman, 1893-1907, U. S. Senator, 1907-1913 and 1915-1929, and Vice President of the United States, 1929-1933.

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Harry Walter Colmery, American Legion Commander, speaking at the dedication of the Flanders Field Chapel, Waeregham, Belgium.

American Battle Monuments Commission

This is a photograph of Harry Walter Colmey, American Legion National Commander, speaking at the dedication of the Flanders Field Chapel, Waeregham, Belgium, August 8, 1937. It was copied from Dedications American War Memorials In Europe, 1937.

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Harry Walter Colmery with his wife Minerva and children

Harry W. Colmery, his wife Minerva (Mina), and their children Harry Jr., Mary, and Sarah are standing by a car.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman during his inaugural parade along Sixth & Kansas in Topeka, Kansas. Huxman, a Democrat, was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, from 1937 to 1930. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972) possibly standing in the bucket of a large mine or quarrying shovel. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. He was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman (in the center) sitting on bales of straw with a group of men. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman and Virgil Patterson on horseback in Anthony, Kansas. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows governors gathered for a celebration in Amarillo, Texas. In the middle is Jas V. Allred of Texas with Erest W. Marland of Oklahom and Teller Ammons of Colorado to his left; and Clyde Tingley of New Mexico and Walter Huxman of Kansas on the right.

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Governor Payne Harry Ratner

This portrait represents Payne Harry Ratner. Ratner was the first resident of Labette County to be elected as County Attorney, holding office from 1923 to 1927. After serving as County Attorney, he went on to serve in the Kansas State Senate from 1929 to 1939, and then later served two terms as Kansas Governor from 1939 to 1943. Notable programs during his administration was implementing a teachers? pension plan and a state employee merit system.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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