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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 23 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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Karl Menninger, M.D. receiving the Distinguished Service Award

The American Psychiatric Association presented Dr. Karl with their Distinguished Service Award at the 1965 meeting. Dr. Karl is known in many circles as a founding father of psychiatry; he produced 15 books that influenced psychiatry over the years.

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Newton Rotary Club Boys Band, Newton, Kansas

A view of the members of the Newton Rotary Club Boys Band of Newton, Kansas.

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Red Cross nurse, Iola, Kansas

Gibson, Arthur

This formal portrait shows a woman dressed as a Red Cross nurse from Iola, Kansas. According to the back of the photograph, she was a member of a theatrical group in Iola.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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William "Bill" Preston Graves, Kansas Governor

Three photographs showing Governor William "Bill" Preston Graves signing SB 424 at the Topeka YWCA day-care center. The bill created a new health insurance program for low income children. Standing behind and beside Graves are: Cimone and Jory, children from the day-care center; Representative Nancy Kirk; Kathleen Sebelius, Insurance Commissioner; Janet Schalansky, Social Rehabilitation Services Deputy Secretary; and Senator Marge Petty.

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Katherine Amelia Whitney Whiting

Leonard, J. H.

This cabinet card shows Katherine Amelia Whitney Whiting (1838-1907). Whiting a native of Waterbury, Vermont received her formal education at the Fairfax and Barrer Academies. She taught school in the Vermont area before marring Albe Burge Whiting on November 15, 1858. Within a year of their marriage the couple were moving to the Kansas territory. In August of 1859, the Whiting's settled near Fort Riley, and founded the town of Milford. For nearly twenty years the couple operated a number of business in the Milford area before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capitol city, Mr. Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures which gave him and his wife the means to give back to the community. As philanthropists the Whitings purchased in 1907 160 acres of land that established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka, as 1,000 year endowments for Washburn College, the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and the Topeka Y.M.C.A. Katherine Whitney Whiting died August 11, 1908 at her Topeka home at the age of 69. Burial was at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Modern Woodmen of America Band, Topeka, Kansas

Members of the Modern Woodmen of America Band of Topeka, Kansas.

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William Alfred Peffer

Prince, George (b. 1848)

This is a photograph of William A. Peffer, a Populist, who served in both the Kansas State Senate from 1874 to 1876 and the United States Senate from 1891 to 1897. In addition, he was an editor of several Kansas newspapers during his professional career.

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