Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Places -- Other States -- Ohio (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Places -- Other States (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 42 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

John H. Linn to Lewis Allen Alderson

Three letters from John H. Linn to Lewis Allen Alderson. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

Lucy Hobbs Taylor's diploma

Ohio College of Dentistry

This is Lucy Hobbs Taylor's diploma from Ohio College of Dentistry. In 1866 she became the first woman in the world to receive a doctorate in dentistry. She married Civil War veteran James Myrtle Taylor and began to teach him dentistry. The couple moved to Lawrence in 1867 and established a joint practice. The Taylors purchased an empty lot in Lawrence (now 809 Vermont Street) and built a combination office and residence. Here they created one of the most successful dental practices in Kansas. They built a home on Ohio Street and moved their practice to a commercial building at 8th and Massachusetts streets. A year after her husband died in 1886, Taylor retired and devoted her time to charity and social causes, namely women's rights.

previewthumb

Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

previewthumb

Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

previewthumb

I. T. Irwin to Lewis Allen Alderson

Letter from I. T. Irwin to Lewis Allen Alderson. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

previewthumb

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

previewthumb

Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5|

Places -- Other States -- Ohio

Places

Places -- Other States

Date

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Thematic Time Period

Transportation