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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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Tea service

This silver tea set was given to Reverend Joseph E. and Nancy Jane (McPherson) Hopkins for their 25th wedding anniversary in 1903. The couple moved to Kansas from Illinois in the late 1870s. Their religious service took them to a number of churches around the state. In 1903, they served at the Methodist Church in Sedan where church members presented them with this tea service for their silver wedding anniversary. The set was put to good use the following year when the Hopkins hosted temperance advocate Carry A. Nation for lunch at their home.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Gardner, R.G.

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865 to 1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee county's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Bliss & Wentworth

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871 McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected ,to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee's County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Dowing, George

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but McAfee's duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and he even gave up his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's Forty-Second District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

This black and white photograph shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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