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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union Frances Willard memorials

This material relates to memorials for Frances Willard, an American reformer for temperance and women's suffrage. She became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1879 and held the position until her death in 1898. The collection includes printed materials relating to the Frances Willard Memorial Fund, Frances Willard Day (September 28th) Citizenship Programs, correspondence of Mary Evelyn Dobbs and Alice K. McFarland, and surveys detailing visits made by Frances Willard to local unions across Kansas. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

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The state of Kansas and Irish immigration

Butler, Thomas Ambrose

In this pamphlet, Irish Catholic priest Thomas Ambrose Butler describes his experience in Kansas as a pastor at the Catholic cathedral in Leavenworth. Butler provides advice to people in Ireland who are thinking of immigrating to the United States.

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The Last Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women

Gordon, Robert (Reverend)

Rev. Robert Gordon apparently was the pastor at the First Baptist Church of Topeka, Kansas. This leaflet was written in response to efforts to defeat the constitutional amendment that would give Kansas women full suffrage in 1912. Gordon is a supporter of woman's suffrage and attempts to respond to arguments of those opposed to the amendment. Gordon states that "this organized, highly-financed, eleventh-hour assault is not inspired by honest conviction. It is a desperate effort born of a craven fear of good women on the part of men who know what women will do . . . ."

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Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Minutes of the Third Session

Methodist Episcopal Church. Kansas and Nebraska Conference

The annual conference was held in Topeka, Kansas Territory from April 15 through 19, 1858. The minutes included the names of those attending as well as the business conducted. It listed the various ministerial appointments in Kansas and Nebraska as well as the membership of the committees. The minutes reported on educational efforts at Baker University and Blue Mount Central College. It contained information on the church's stand on slavery and temperance. The constitution of the Kansas and Nebraska Conference Missionary Society was included in the report as were statistics for the various churches.

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Historical Sketch, Confession of Faith and Covenant, and Standing Rules

First Church of Christ, Wabaunsee

This printed pamphlet contained all of the items listed in the title for the First Church of Christ in Wabaunsee, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory. The church was also known as the Beecher Bible and Rifle Church.

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Thomas L. McKenney to James Barbour

McKenney, Thomas Loraine, 1785-1859

Thomas McKenney, the current Superintendent of Indian Affairs, wrote this letter to James Barbour, Secretary of War, explaining the perceived success of the government?s attempts to ?civilize? Indian tribes. As part of this process of ?civilization,? the government believed that it was necessary for native groups to become assimilated into white American society by adopting white agricultural methods, Christianity, and other elements of European American culture. Thomas McKenney was a passionate proponent of this system, and so he included a transcription of a letter written by a Cherokee man named David Brown who describes how his people had adopted Christianity, a republican form of government, and other elements of white culture. According to McKenney, as well as many other white Americans during this time period, the ?civilization? process had a positive effect on Native Americans. McKenney also advocated Indian removal, writing that ?should they retain their present location [within the United States] they will, in the course of a few years, be lost as a race.?

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Ottawa First Book

Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855

The Ottawa First Book contains lessons for those seeking to learn the Ottawa language. It also contains portions of the gospel of Luke and the laws of the Ottawa Indians. The laws begin on page 102. One page in English and the other in the Ottawa language. The book was published by Jotham Meeker, a Baptist missionary. Pages 56-57 are stuck together.

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