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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The new chicken in the barnyard

Judge Magazine

This cartoon, from the cover of the satirical magazine Judge, illustrates the ?birth? of the Populist Party. Hovering over the chick (who has a banner on his straw hat labeled ?Farmer?s Alliance") is a rooster symbolizing the Republican Party, and a chicken, representing the Democratic Party. The subtitle reads, ?THE LITTLE CHICK (to old parties -- "You?re too big for me just now, 'tis true, but I?ll lick you both in ?92. Cock-a-doodle-doodle-doo!!?

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Several reasons why flies should be unwelcome guests. Swat the fly!

An illustration copied from the Kansas State Board of Health Bulletin demonstrating poor health habits and encouraging people to limit contact with flies.

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The Grangers' dream of cheap money

Puck

This political cartoon from the satirical Puck magazine illustrates the Republican perception of the People?s (Populist) Party belief in the coinage of silver and the redistribution of wealth to the masses. In the cartoon, Populist senator William Peffer uses a bellows to propel the windmill of the U.S. Treasury in order to pump out more ?greenbacks.? Outside the windmill, farmers are hungrily grabbing bags of money and carting them away in wagons. Billboards in the nearby town refer to the rapid inflation caused by the distribution of so much money.

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The poor donkey has too many drivers

Judge Magazine

In this political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge, Populist senators William Peffer and ?Sockless? Jerry Simpson push a boulder (symbolizing the Farmer?s Alliance) under the wheel of a wagon that represents the United States. In the driver?s seat are five congressmen, each with their own agenda labeled on their sash. The wagon is being pulled by a donkey signifying ?democracy.? Judge magazine, created by artists who had allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881 and its sales eventually surpassed those of its rival, Puck.

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The foolish appeals of the political tramps

Judge Magazine

This political cartoon from the satirical magazine Jude depicts a farmer (representing Uncle Sam) standing in his wheatfield talking to a Democrat and two Populists, "Sockless" Jerry Simpson and William Peffer, both from Kansas. These three men are attempting to convince the farmer of the importance of free trade and free silver, but he remains satisfied with the current situation. Meanwhile, across the sea in Europe, there are starving peasants begging for relief. The cartoon is meant as a criticism of the Populists' and Democrats' desire to "save" farmers. Judge magazine, created by artists who had worked at Puck magazine and who allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881.

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Gulliver bound down by the Democratic Lilliputians

Judge Magazine

This political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge illustrates the Republican perception of the Democratic Party and Peoples' (Populist) Party by adapting a classic story from Gulliver's Travels. The cartoon depicts politicians, activists, and wealthy Americans tying down a giant man who symbolizes industrial prosperity. The ties stretching across his lower body represent "tariff tinkering" and "free silver," political issues where many Democrats and Populists were in agreement. William Peffer, a Kansas Populist, stands on a podium near the center giving a speech about silver. Judge magazine, created by artists who had previously worked for the well-known magazine Puck, began in 1881.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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