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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 7, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

Correspondence sent from the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. The Superintendents of Indian Affairs during this period were Joshua Pilcher, David D. Mitchell, and Thomas H. Harvey. Their correspondence with Indian agents and sub-agencies concerned the disbursement of allotments and annuities, the settling of expenses and treaty stipulations, and the nominations of blacksmiths, interpreters, and farmers for several tribes. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains correspondence sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri from 1847-1855. The correspondence was sent by the Superintendents of Indian Affairs to the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. During this period the superintendents included Thomas H. Harvey, David D. Mitchell, and Alfred Cumming; the commissioners included William Medill, Orlando Brown, Luke Lea, and George Washington Manypenny. Topics of discussion focused on the appropriation of federal funds for treaties, the hiring and firing of Indian agents, and the transportation and storage of goods and supplies. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 18/19, Property returns and accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

These volumes contain records of current accounts and property returns as recorded by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Joshua Pilcher, at the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Property listed includes office furniture, stationery supplies, and other provisions granted by treaty stipulations. Expenditures are recorded for several sub-agencies, including Fort Leavenworth, Upper Missouri, Council Bluffs, Great Nemaha and Osage River, and the various Indian tribes in each region. These expenditures included salaries for blacksmiths and interpreters and agricultural implements. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 13, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, at St. Louis, Missouri. Joshua Pilcher (1839-1841) and David D. Mitchell (1841-1844) held this position following the death of William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) in 1838. Expenditures are recorded for several sub-agencies, including Fort Leavenworth, Upper Missouri, Council Bluffs, Great Nemaha and Osage River, and the various Indian tribes in each region. These expenditures included salaries for blacksmiths and interpreters and agricultural implements. Volumes 12 and 13 are bound together. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 15, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, at St. Louis, Missouri. Thomas H. Harvey held this position from 1844-1849. Expenditures are recorded for several sub-agencies, including Fort Leavenworth, Upper Missouri, Council Bluffs, Great Nemaha and Osage River, and the various Indian tribes in each region. These expenditures included salaries for blacksmiths and interpreters, annuities, and provisions. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. Volumes 14 and 15 are bound together.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Oscar Dayton to Orville Chester Brown

Dayton, Oscar V

This letter, written by Oscar Dayton from the Banking Office of Dayton and Co., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, was addressed to Orville C. Brown, a founder of Osawatomie. The main subject of the letter was a printing press and other pertinent materials that were available to the residents of Osawatomie, if they in turn paid Dayton's debts and granted him deeds for town lots in Osawatomie. That was Dayton's preferred method of payment. Furthermore, Dayton informed Brown that there were other men who were interested in purchasing the printing press, so he needed a speedy reply to this letter. It concluded with personal regards to Mr. Brown's family.

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