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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Master Farm Homemakers

Kansas Master Farm Homemaker Guild

Two disbound scrapbooks containing photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, and pamphlets documenting the history of the Kansas Master Farm Homemakers and the Kansas Master Farmers.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war

Bull, Floyd R.

In this reminiscence, Floyd R. Bull, a member of the El Dorado company of the Kansas National Guard, recalls his involvment in the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, violence broke out between the competing legislative houses--the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House--prompting Populist Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to call the National Guard to the capitol. On February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war." This reminiscence is a copy of an earlier statement by Bull, written in 1938.

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Arthur Capper, Charles Curtis, and John W. Thomas

Henry Miller News Picture Service

Arthur Capper, United States senator from Kansas, Charles Curtis, vice president of the United States, and John W. Thomas, United States senator from Idaho, in Washington, D. C., are photographed with 4-H Club members from Kansas. Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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