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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 45 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Theodosius Botkin

Downing, George

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was taken in Topeka, Kansas, when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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William Cather Hook

This is a portrait of William Cather Hook, who was born in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, on September 24, 1857, the son of Enos and Elizabeth (Inghram) Hook. The family came west and in 1867. They settled in Leavenworth, which became the family's permanent home. William Hook graduated from Leavenworth High School and then studied in the law office of Clough and Wheat. He later studied at St. Louis Law School, Law Department of Washington University, and graduated in 1878. After graduation, Hook became a member of the Lucian Baker law firm in Leavenworth. When Mr. Baker was elected to the United States Senate, the law firm of Baker, Hook and Atwood was formed. In 1899 William Hook was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Kansas. He was advanced to the bench of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1903, appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt. Judge Hook remained on the federal bench until his death on August 11, 1921.

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Theodosius Botkin

Dimock, S. W.

A portrait of Theodosius Botkin taken in Topeka, Kansas when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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Theodosius Botkin

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was possibly taken in Hutchinson, Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Ronald Reagan

This is a photograph of Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Bill Clinton

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President Bill Clinton. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman during his inaugural parade along Sixth & Kansas in Topeka, Kansas. Huxman, a Democrat, was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, from 1937 to 1930. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972) possibly standing in the bucket of a large mine or quarrying shovel. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. He was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman (in the center) sitting on bales of straw with a group of men. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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