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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 20 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Indian Scouts in General Lane's camp

Harper's Weekly illustration of Indian scouts in the camp of General James Lane. The illustration concerns a civil war conflict near Humansville, Missouri.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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Spanish Fandango

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Guitarist Henry Worrall published his arrangement of the celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Spanish Fandango" about 1866 with J.L. Peters & Bros., music publisher, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Medley of airs

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Several instrumental pieces by Henry Worrall are included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only Worrall's "Medley of Airs" and is from his personal music collection. The medley includes the following songs: "Whal be King but Charlie," "Spanish Dance," "Gliding Jessy," "Fisher's Hornpipe," "Celebrated Spanish Serenade," and "Smith's West End Serenade." The title page includes the inscription "From Mama [Mary E. Harvey Worrall], March 9th, 1903, 715 Polk St, Topeka." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Part 12: Exodusters, in first annual report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas Bureau of Labor

This excerpt of the Kansas Bureau of Labor report includes only Part 12, the portion of the report focusing on the Exodusters in Wyandotte, Kansas. The report includes transcribed testimonies of Exodusters as well as a detailed table showing statistics compiled from seventeen families, including their location, ages, health, and occupations. The report also includes a few references to Exodusters in Topeka.

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Worrall's guitar school

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

In the 1850s, guitarist Henry Worrall published this popular guitar tutorial with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. By the 1880s, Worrall had acquired copyright to the publication and issued a reprint with the Oliver Ditson Company of Boston, Massachusetts. The tutorial includes instructions, exercises, and popular music for playing solo acoustic guitar. Special instructions for playing Worrall's celebrated "Sebastopol" are also included. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868, and remained there until his death in 1902.

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Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter, of Virginia, speech

Hunter, Robert M. T.

Senator Robert M.T. Hunter delivered this speech on the floor of the Senate in support of adopting Kansas into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution. Hunter argued that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention had been formed under the consent and election of the people of Kansas, not as an instrument of the Territorial Government. He also stated that those accused of being "foreign" Missouri voters were nothing more than settlers who had staked their claims in the fall of 1857 and left them to return the following spring. Hunter added that it would have been impossible to ascertain the true will of the people if the entire Lecompton Constitution would have been put to a vote, as it would be unlikely that voters would approve or disapprove of every single provision it might include. Ultimately, Hunter believed that "white men should have the continent, not as equals of the Indians or the negros, but as their masters."

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Capretio

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

A manuscript copy of a guitar solo titled "Capretio" by Henry Worrall. Worrall published his solo guitar instrumental "Capretio on a Mexican Air" about 1866 with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. The copyright of this piece was credited to J.L. Peters and Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. Worrall's manuscript copy of his "Capretio" [presented here] may date from an earlier or later period. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Worrall's celebrated Mexican air. A capretio for the guitar

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Henry Worrall publishes his celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Mexican Air" with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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1880 census of Farmer Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Farmer Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

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