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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 24 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lone Pine

Coy Avon Seward

Black and white intaglio print on paper, depicting a single pine tree in a rocky terrain. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people. Seward inscribed this print to the donor, Virginia McArthur of Hutchinson, who saw Seward produce the print in 1934.

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John Brown surveyor's compass

Phelps & Gurley

While in Kansas John Brown was employed as a surveyor, an occupation which allowed him to move around freely to locate and observe proslavery camps. This compass was part of a surveying kit made by Phelps and Gurley of Troy, New York. According to a 1915 Omaha Sunday Bee newspaper article, Brown sold the compass kit to his neighbor, Simon B. McGrew, in 1858. McGrew lived in Mound City at the time. The compass was used to survey Linn, Anderson, and Bourbon counties.

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Andrew H. Reeder portrait

Hall, Cyrenius

Portrait of Andrew Horatio Reeder, 1807-1864, who was the first governor of Kansas Territory. In 1855, Reeder was removed from office by President Pierce and forced to leave Kansas when threatened with arrest for a charge of high treason issued by a pro-slavery grand jury. He escaped with the help of Thomas and Julia Stinson, who dressed him in women's clothing. In May 1856, Reeder disguised himself as a woodcutter (as depicted in this painting) and escaped via a steamboat on the Missouri River. Artist Cyrenius Hall painted this portrait in 1880.

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Noonday Rest

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing cows grazing and resting under a tree. The artist described this as a ?composite scene of a typical Kansas vista.? Noonday Rest was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

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John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

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John R. Brinkley

Herschel C. Logan

This portrait of John R. Brinkley was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

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Drouthy Kansas

Worrall, Henry

This painting by Henry Worrall, completed in 1878, challenges the assumption that Kansas was part of the "Great American Desert." Although there had, indeed, been a severe drought during 1860, Worrall believed that Kansas did not deserve this harsh reputation. In the foreground, his painting depicts the bountiful harvests of grain, watermelon, and potatoes, while the background includes rain showers and a rainbow stretching across the horizon. Although Worrall was a very productive artist, "Drouthy Kansas" quickly became his most famous work.

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Sod Shanty

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing a man seated on left side of open doorway to his one-story sod shanty. According to the artist, the print was executed in Kansas. Sod Shanty was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

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Brinkley for Governor paperweight

This paperweight, in the shape of a horned goat, was distributed as part of one or more of Dr. John R. Brinkley's unsuccessful campaigns for the office of Kansas governor. Dr. Brinkley, a physician from Milford, Kansas, until his medical license was revoked in 1930, was famous for his advocacy of goat gland transplants. He ran as an independent write-in candidate for governor of Kansas in 1930, 1932, and 1934.

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Quantrill's raid

Fisk, Lauretta Louise Fox

This black and white water color on paper was created by Lauretta Louise Fox Fisk, wife of Washburn College sociology professor Dr. D.M. Fisk, shows Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863. Confederate guerilla forces led by William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, attacked Lawrence, Kansas, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town.

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