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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Worrall watercolor

Worrall, Henry

This promotional watercolor of Kansas scenes was painted by artist Henry Worrall for the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). It is believed that Worrall painted the poster for the Kansas chapter of the WCTU to use at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition held in New Orleans in 1884. The poster depicts Topeka and various types of Kansas iconography.

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Edna Ferber inscribed book

Doubleday, Page & Company, Inc.

This book was written by prolific American novelist Edna Ferber (1885-1968) who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1925. She first met William Allen White when they covered the 1912 Republican National Convention for the same newspaper syndicate. They became close lifelong friends. Ferber handwrote on book?s front flyleaf ?For the William Allen Whites-- who won't particularly care for it. from Edna, who doesn't either. Chicago Oct 26 ? 1920?

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John Brown surveyor's compass

Phelps & Gurley

While in Kansas John Brown was employed as a surveyor, an occupation which allowed him to move around freely to locate and observe proslavery camps. This compass was part of a surveying kit made by Phelps and Gurley of Troy, New York. According to a 1915 Omaha Sunday Bee newspaper article, Brown sold the compass kit to his neighbor, Simon B. McGrew, in 1858. McGrew lived in Mound City at the time. The compass was used to survey Linn, Anderson, and Bourbon counties.

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John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

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Carry Nation poster

F. M. Steves & Sons Printers

Large, rectangular color poster advertising an appearance by Carry Nation, a temperance advocate who gained notoriety by attacking saloons. Her activities began in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1899. A hatchet was her symbol because she often used the tool to smash saloon fixtures. In Nation?s autobiography, The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, she explained the genesis of this poster. While jailed in Topeka for smashing saloon fixtures in July 1901, Nation received a letter from James Furlong, manager of the Lyceum Theater in Rochester, New York. According to Nation, Furlong offered to bail her out of jail if she granted him some lecture dates. She agreed, was pardoned, and left almost immediately for a Chautauqua in Clarksburg, Ohio. Her lecture series continued across upstate New York.

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Las Animas

Tavernier, Jules

Brown wash sketch titled "Las Animas" by Jules Tavernier. Tavernier was born in Paris in 1844 and trained as an artist in France. He served as a soldier in the Franco-Prussian War, and his drawings of war-torn Paris were flown by hot air balloon to London for publication. After the war he worked as an illustrator in London and then in New York for Harper's Weekly. In 1872, Harper's sent him on a trip across the United States on an assignment to document the American West. He arrived in San Francisco in 1874. This sketch is most likely a scene that Tavernier saw while in Colorado on that trip. Tavernier went on to be a well-known artist in California before moving to Hawaii, where he was part of a group of artists known as the Volcano School. He died in Honolulu in 1889.

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Walt Mason Poster

Adams, George Matthew

Poster advertising "Uncle Walt," a book of Walt Mason's prose poetry. The poster features a reproduction of the book's frontispiece, a cartoon by John T. McCutcheon. "Uncle Walt" was published in 1910 by George Matthew Adams of Chicago. Mason was a newspaper man who worked with William Allen White at the Emporia Gazette. The remainder of the illustrations were done by William Stevens, and the book was arranged and decorated by Will Bradley. William Allen White wrote the book's introduction, "A Poet of the People." George Matthew Adams ran a newspaper syndication service that syndicated the writing of both Mason and White.

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Colmery desk

Wooden desk with green leather top. Harry W. Colmery (1890-1979) sat at this desk at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. while hand-writing the first draft of what would become the Serviceman?s Readjustment Act of 1944, also known as the G.I. Bill of Rights, over a period of five months. The desk was later moved to Colmery's law office in Topeka.

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