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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This correspondence was sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Hiram T. Benam served as Adjutant General from 1876-1878 and Peter S. Noble served from 1878-1883. It includes inquiries made from men "anxious for organization" hoping to enlist militias in the towns of Parsons, Independence, Iuka, Lawrence, and Hutchinson. The collection also includes bill of ladings from the Kansas Pacific Railway and Rock Island (Illinois) Arsenal. Frequent correspondence was exchanged with Willis Brown, cashier for the State Bank of Kansas in Seneca, Kansas, Scott Hopkins of the Kansas University Cadets, John T. Bradley, a lawyer from Council Grove and member of the Kansas Senate from 1876 to 1880, F.C. Merrill, a lumber dealer from Paola, and E.D. Rose, a hardware dealer from Holton.

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Kansas Adjutant General miscellaneous correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This is correspondence received by Kansas Adjutant General Alexander B. Campbell. Frequent correspondents include S.L. Patrick, M.C. Reville, J.F. Morrison, P.W. Kreskey, C.T. Kelton, and Ben L. Henderson, among others. Many of these men were members of the Kansas National Guard who were employed as lawyers, some specializing in military pension claims.

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Earl Thomas Reynolds to Governor Fred Hall

Reynolds, Earl Thomas

This letter was written by Earl Thomas Reynolds, a lawyer in Coffeyville, Kansas, to Governor Fred Hall. Reynolds was concerned that black people in Kansas were not receiving adequate patronage and political party representation in or by the Republican Party, particularly in the third district. Mr Reynolds inquired why should blacks continue to support the Republican Party, at all levels of government, if their support is not rewarded by the party.

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A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-

Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject businesses

Kansas Film Commission

These are panoramic photographs of locations in Kansas created by the Kansas Film Commission to promote scenes to film companies. The panoramics were created by taking individual photos and taping them together. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by subject and then location. The subject of this part of the collection is businesses, including banks, bars, general stores, food stores, funeral homes, gas stations, hotels, malls, miscellaneous buildings, newspaper offices, restaurants, toy stores, and workshops.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, legal advice

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to legal advice. Topics included in the correspondence but not limited to is local government, inmate parole and civil court such as divorce. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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Proposal for Majority Verdicts by Juries

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This file includes correspondence relating to a proposal for majority verdicts by juries. Topics included, but not limited to, in the correspondence is reducing public expense for cases, verdicts to be heard at three-fourths agreement of jury, and data of jury verdict proceedings by state. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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