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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S. H. B. Schoonmaker to Governor John P. St. John

Shoonmaker, S. H. B.

S. H. B. Shoonmaker of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, wrote this letter to Governor St. John on behalf of the black residents of his parish (county). He asked the governor a number of specific questions, including how these black emigrants could obtain land, where they should settle, and whether there were relief organizations that could assist the refugees. In addition to his service as governor, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Kansas territorial census, 1855. District 17

Johnson, Alex S.

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 17, the place of election was the house of B. F. Robinson. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The 17th Dist was organized by a supplemental proclamation of the governor, Nov. 25, 1854. He declared that it seemed expedient that the first district should be divided to form the 17th district, which was located in the east part of the present Johnson county, quoted as to bounds as follows, (from the ex minutes, 1854, p. 24.) "beginning at the mouth of the Kansas river; thence up said river to the mouth of Cedar creek; thence up said creek to the Santa Fe Road; thence by said road and the Missouri State Line to the place of beginning."

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Isabella Barnes to Governor Edward Hoch

Barnes, Isabella

Mrs. Isabella Barnes of Liberal, Kansas, writes Governor Edward Hoch of Topeka concerning her wish to wear men's clothing. Mrs. Barnes states that she would like to wear men's clothing to help her obtain suitable employment and avoid unwanted insults from men. She has contacted the U. S. Attorney General at Washington D. C. concerning this issue and asks Governor Hoch if she would be liable to arrest and if there was not some way for a woman to receive permission to wear men's clothes. Isabella's concerns illustrate many women's efforts to transcend narrowly defined social and sexual roles in the early twentieth century.

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Roy Hennigh to Arthur Capper

Hennigh, Roy

Roy Hennigh, owner of a grocery store in Sabetha, Nemaha County, wrote this letter to the governor concerning a recent visit to his store by a female deputy factory inspector. According to Hennigh, this inspector informed him that his two teenage daughters could not work in his store on the weekends according to the child labor laws. Hennigh argues that he does not officially employ his children, or any other children, because ?they help me just as anybody?s children should.? He believes it is ?very poor judgement to enact a law which forbids parents to use the help of their own children.? He also takes issue with the fact that a female inspector evaluated his business. P. J. McBride, Commissioner of Labor and Industry, replied to this letter on December 12, 1917.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Embalming Board applications

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment for the Embalming Board. Embalming is the process of preserving a person's body for burial or cremation. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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