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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 46 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

North Star Drug Store, Salina, Kansas

These photographs show exterior and interior views of the North Star Drug Store in Salina, Kansas. The first photograph shows an exterior view of the store with four men standing in front of the doorway. They are identified as Emil Lagbach, Bill Cacher (son of Dr. Cacher), A. Lagbach (assistant), and Mister Nelson (druggist). The sign above the doorway includes the traditional mortar and pestle pharmacy symbol, and also has the words "Svensk Apotek," identifying the store as a "Swedish pharmacy." Signs in the window advertise "Wa-Hoo Blood and Nerve Tonic." The second photograph shows an interior view of the store with employees and customers visible in the picture. A display case with boxes of cigars is visible on the left. A table with newspapers and magazines on it is visible in the middle, with other tables and chairs behind it. A soda fountain service counter is visible on the right. Signs above the shelves advertise cigars, perfumes, photo supplies, rubber goods, prescriptions, stationery, and candy.

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Fred Harvey dining room, Los Angeles, California

Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company

This black and white photograph shows soldiers eating at the Fred Harvey dining room inside the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal. More than 73,000 meals were served to military personnel.

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Barber shop, Wichita, Kansas

Rafael Lopez and an unidentified barber at the McConnell Air Force Base barber shop, Wichita, Kansas.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard possibly taken when she graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

Goldberg, Jack

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard

A portrait of Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard. They were married in 1942 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's Fred Harvey House staff, El Paso, Texas

Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company

This black and white photograph shows the staff at the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's Fred Harvey House, El Paso, Texas.

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Victoria Murdoch-Hightower

A portrait of Victoria Murdoch-Hightower who was born in 1888. She married Rufus Hightower, a police officer, in the 1920s. He died in the line of duty, and after his death, Victoria found work as a probation officer. Later she went to Madam C. J. Walker's School of Cosmetology in Kansas City, Kansas and after graduation, she worked at Newt Bower's funeral home in Coffeyville, Kansas. When he decided to sell the business, she purchased it and changed the name to the Hightower Funeral Home. She became the first female African-American funeral director in Kansas. Victoria expanded her business when she purchased the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. She later sold the funeral home in Coffeyville. Victoria died in 1942, and her daughter Xavia Earline Hightower obtained her funeral director's and embalmer's licenses and began operating the funeral home. Xavia sold the business in 1998.

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Barbershop, Lawrence, Kansas

Lawrence Studio

This photograph from a nitrate negative shows a young boy receiving a haircut at a barbershop in Lawrence, Kansas.

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