Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Teachers (Remove)
Military (Remove)
Date (Remove)
People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
Community Life (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 4 records out of 4 total, starting on record 1, ending on 4

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Edwards

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

Orville C. Brown wrote this letter from Osawatomie to Mr. Edwards, regarding a shipment of school books. He also wrote concerning a common school in the area that would begin classes in May, taught by a Mr. Martin. Brown also mentioned, rather briefly, the needs of the Osawatomie community, including such skilled workers as blacksmiths and carpenters.

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson?s role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown?s violent actions; while he deemed them ?reckless and hopeless,? he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown?s own religious beliefs and the violence of ?the slave power".

previewthumb

Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

previewthumb

Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war

Bull, Floyd R.

In this reminiscence, Floyd R. Bull, a member of the El Dorado company of the Kansas National Guard, recalls his involvment in the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, violence broke out between the competing legislative houses--the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House--prompting Populist Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to call the National Guard to the capitol. On February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war." This reminiscence is a copy of an earlier statement by Bull, written in 1938.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>