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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a ?disgrace to Kansas.? William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the ?rebel? troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.

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Spirit of Washington, Washington School, Topeka, Kansas

Thompson, Joseph A.

This silent film documents a day at Washington School, a Black elementary school located at 1025 Washington, Topeka, Kansas. The film follows each grade level through various activities throughout the day. Washington was one of four Black elementary schools in Topeka prior to the the U. S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education (1954) that called for the desegregation of public schools.

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Major problem in Kansas--negro teachers hit by desegregation

Murphy, Anna Mary

This article describes how the desegregation of schools in the wake of the Brown v. Board of Education case would affect black schoolteachers across Kansas. The author gives the example of Topeka where, when the school board began desegregating schools prior to the final decision in the Brown case, black teachers lost their jobs. Although the school board wanted to ?avoid any disruption of the professional life of career teachers,? many schools were hesitant to place black teachers in classrooms containing both white and black students. Members of the black community who had opposed the Brown v. Board case at the local level had feared that integration would apply only to students, not to teachers, and it appeared to some that this would in fact be the case.

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An appeal to Kansas teachers in behalf of temperance, health, and moral purity

Johns, Laura M

This pamphlet on prohibition was mailed to each Kansas school superintendent and to 11,500 school teachers. It was to be used by the teachers and passed along to the pupils and their parents.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Edwards

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

Orville C. Brown wrote this letter from Osawatomie to Mr. Edwards, regarding a shipment of school books. He also wrote concerning a common school in the area that would begin classes in May, taught by a Mr. Martin. Brown also mentioned, rather briefly, the needs of the Osawatomie community, including such skilled workers as blacksmiths and carpenters.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew was born in Pennsylvania, and his family moved first to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873, he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery. Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874, and returned to Illinois to marry Montgomery in June, 1876. The Bartholomews returned to Kansas in September, 1876, and lived on their farm on Bow Creek in Rooks County until 1929. They then moved south to Hays, Kansas, in Ellis County, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College until his death in 1934.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson?s role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown?s violent actions; while he deemed them ?reckless and hopeless,? he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown?s own religious beliefs and the violence of ?the slave power".

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