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People -- Notable Kansans -- Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 37 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas, plays music with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harvey Worrall. Henry and Mary frequently performed together in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Spanish Fandango" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Henry Worrall died in Topeka in 1902. Mary Worrall died in Topeka in 1915.

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Henry Worrall watercolor

Worrall, Henry

This promotional watercolor of Kansas scenes was painted by artist Henry Worrall for the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). It is believed that Worrall painted the poster for the Kansas chapter of the WCTU to use at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition held in New Orleans in 1884. The poster depicts Topeka and various types of Kansas iconography.

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Chimes of E

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript copy of a solo guitar instrumental he called "Chimes of E." This piece is presumed to be an original composition or arrangement by Worrall. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Henry Worrall with a plant grown in the great Arkansas Valley

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Henry Worrall with a plant specimen grown in the Great Arkansas Valley. Besides being a musician and illustrator, Worrall was involved in promoting the agricultural potential of Kansas.

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Spanish Fandango

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Guitarist Henry Worrall published his arrangement of the celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Spanish Fandango" about 1866 with J.L. Peters & Bros., music publisher, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Col. O.W. Wheeler's cattle herd

Baker-Co

View of Col. O. W. Wheeler's herd en route to the Kansas Pacific Railway in 1867. The illustration was copied from "Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade" by Joseph McCoy published in 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.

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Untitled and Jack

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript music for two solo guitar instrumentals, one untitled and one titled "Jack." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Medley of airs

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Several instrumental pieces by Henry Worrall are included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only Worrall's "Medley of Airs" and is from his personal music collection. The medley includes the following songs: "Whal be King but Charlie," "Spanish Dance," "Gliding Jessy," "Fisher's Hornpipe," "Celebrated Spanish Serenade," and "Smith's West End Serenade." The title page includes the inscription "From Mama [Mary E. Harvey Worrall], March 9th, 1903, 715 Polk St, Topeka." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Carmencita

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

A guitar solo titled "Carmencita" in manuscript by guitarist Henry Worrall. Worrall published his solo instrumental "Carmencita Series of Mexican Dances" with E.B. Guild music publisher of Topeka, Kansas, about 1896. The date of Worrall's manuscript copy of "Carmencita" [presented here] is unknown. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Drouthy Kansas

Worrall, Henry

This painting by Henry Worrall, completed in 1878, challenges the assumption that Kansas was part of the "Great American Desert." Although there had, indeed, been a severe drought during 1860, Worrall believed that Kansas did not deserve this harsh reputation. In the foreground, his painting depicts the bountiful harvests of grain, watermelon, and potatoes, while the background includes rain showers and a rainbow stretching across the horizon. Although Worrall was a very productive artist, "Drouthy Kansas" quickly became his most famous work.

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