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People -- Notable Kansans -- Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel L. Adair to William F. M. Arny

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Arny was a representative of the National Kansas Committee. In this letter, Adair inquires about various boxes and money that had been sent to the committee in Chicago to forward to people in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair also seems to be responding to a request from Arny for information about settlers from Wisconsin in the Osawatomie area and also members of the Eldridge-Pomeroy party. Adair provides information on James Fuller, Thomas Roberts, Joseph Lawes and William and Wakeman (?) Partridge. He lists the names of four men who came with Eldridge and Pomeroy but provides no additional information about them. He also notes that he loaned Mr. Hyatt $50 and had an "order" for Arny to reimburse him.

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James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Garrison, James

James Garrison writes from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, to his cousin Samuel Adair in Kansas Territory. The letter discusses relief efforts on behalf of the free state settlers and concerns about fraud on the part of agents collecting money and goods. Garrison writes that the Cincinnati Gazette had published a long list of names of Kansas citizens who had been refused clothing by the relief society. He feels an explanation to the public was needed if the relief efforts were to be continued. The letterhead included an engraving of Antioch College. The sheet of paper also contained a letter from Gamaliel Garrison. (See item #90260.)

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G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

Lewis, G. S.

G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mrs. H. L. Hibbard

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Adair, writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, reports on conditions in Kansas to Mrs. Hibbard, who was the president of the Woman's Kansas Aid and Liberty Association of Chicago, Illinois. Adair states that many recent emigrants are ill, and that others, who are using up their own reserves to help the emigrants, hope they will be repaid by aid received in Kansas. He reports that a group of Georgians camped near Osawatomie had run off more than 18 horses. Some free state men had prepared to confront them, but the Georgians had already left the area. Adair writes of rumors that a large force was coming to burn Osawatomie.

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Marian S. Hand to Samuel and Florella Adair

Hand, Marian S.

Marian S. (Brown) Hand, Rawsonville, Ohio, writes her sister, Florella Brown Adair, and brother-in-law, Samuel Adair, inquiring about events in Kansas Territory and about their brother, John Brown, and his sons. She says that Kansas Aid Societies and Ladies Aid Societies were forming to help families that suffered in Kansas Territory. Her husband, T. W. Hand, adds a note to the end of the letter discussing politics. He feels that Fremont would be elected President and that would insure freedom in Kansas and the North.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this draft letter, Samuel Adair writes from Hudson, Ohio, discussing his plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. Adair indicates his family consisted of four people and describes the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also writes that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

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