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Thematic Time Period -- Industrialization and the National Economy, 1870 - 1920 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 6 records out of 6 total, starting on record 1, ending on 6

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Andrieus A. Jones to Edmund G. Ross

Ross, Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson), 1826-1907

Jones acknowledges receipt of copies of Ross's history of the presidential impeachment trial and will share it with leading Democrats in Chicago during the campaign convention.

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Secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen to George W. Jacobs

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

The secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, writes to Philadelphia publisher George Jacobs acknowledging receipt of a letter regarding the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. In October 1919, Jacobs had written to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suggesting the creation of a court system that would function much like the District and Federal Court system for the purpose of settling disputes between capital and labor.

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George Jacobs to Governor Henry Allen

Jacobs, George W.

Publisher George Jacobs of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, writes to Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, about the recent creation of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. Jacobs had earlier suggested the creation of a state and national court system designed to settle labor and capital disputes. In this letter, Jacobs requests further information about the Kansas law and thanks the governor "for any courtesy you may show in this connection."

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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William Allen White

This is a photo of William Allen White's family at their cabin in Colorado. Son William Lindsay and daughter Mary Katherine are sitting on a horse with their mother, Sallie, standing next to them. As publisher and editor of the Emporia Gazette, White gained national fame with his editorial "What's the Matter with Kansas?" during the Populist era in the 1890s.

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Clyde Cessna

This photograph shows a group of men including Clyde Cessna (4th from left) posing with the first plane built in Wichita. The image includes a description that reads "a part of the Beaver Boosters, Okla [Oklahoma]."

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