Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Publishers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Objects and Artifacts (Remove)
Places -- Other States (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown

Medlar

A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

previewthumb

William Allen White in Colorado

This is a photograph showing William Allen White in a rocking chair on the porch of his cabin in Colorado. White was the long time editor of the Emporia Gazette.

previewthumb

Secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen to George W. Jacobs

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

The secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, writes to Philadelphia publisher George Jacobs acknowledging receipt of a letter regarding the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. In October 1919, Jacobs had written to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suggesting the creation of a court system that would function much like the District and Federal Court system for the purpose of settling disputes between capital and labor.

previewthumb

Henry Kuhn collection letterpress books

Kuhn, Henry, 1830-1900

Copies of correspondence both received and sent by Captain Henry Kuhn dating from after the Civil War until shortly before his death in 1898. Some of the letters are illegible. Much of the correspondence regards Kuhn's banking and other financial interests, particularly in Leavenworth, as well as other business and personal affairs, including during his time as an Indian agent in the Oklahoma area. Kuhn was county surveyor and township clerk in Atchison County, Indian agent in the Indian territory, publisher of a Marion County newspaper, and was otherwise a prominent Kansas citizen of the nineteenth century.

previewthumb

George Jacobs to Governor Henry Allen

Jacobs, George W.

Publisher George Jacobs of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, writes to Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, about the recent creation of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. Jacobs had earlier suggested the creation of a state and national court system designed to settle labor and capital disputes. In this letter, Jacobs requests further information about the Kansas law and thanks the governor "for any courtesy you may show in this connection."

previewthumb

William Allen White and friends hiking in Colorado

This photograph shows (left to right) a young William Allen White, Helen Sutliffe, Schuyler Brewster, Herbert Hadley and Janice (?) Sutliffe hiking at Long's Peak in Colorado. White later became the editor of the Emporia Gazette.

previewthumb

William Allen White and friends hiking in Colorado

This is a photograph showing (left to right) William Allen White, Helen Sutliffe, Henry Riggs, unidentified woman, Frederick Funston, and an unidentified woman on an outing on Deer Mountain in Colorado.

previewthumb

Edmund Gibson Ross

Portait of Edmund Gibson Ross, U.S. Senator from Kansas. Ross helped raise and then served in the Eleventh Kansas during the Civil War. After James H. Lane's death by suicide in 1866, Ross was appointed and subsequently elected to the Lane seat in the U.S. Senate. While serving as senator from Kansas in 1868, Ross won fame as the senator who cast the deciding vote for acquittal in the impeachment trial of President Johnson.

previewthumb

Re-enacting President Lincoln raising of the 34 star flag

A photograph showing Kansas Governor John Anderson Jr. and Rolla Clymer portraying President Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at a centennial commemorative event.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>