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Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Publishers (Remove)
Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 4 records out of 4 total, starting on record 1, ending on 4

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Daniel Read Anthony

This carte de visite shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1854, as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but successfully led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.

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Edmund Gibson Ross

Portait of Edmund Gibson Ross, U.S. Senator from Kansas. Ross helped raise and then served in the Eleventh Kansas during the Civil War. After James H. Lane's death by suicide in 1866, Ross was appointed and subsequently elected to the Lane seat in the U.S. Senate. While serving as senator from Kansas in 1868, Ross won fame as the senator who cast the deciding vote for acquittal in the impeachment trial of President Johnson.

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