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Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Publishers (Remove)
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Page 1 of 7, showing 10 records out of 62 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Edwin F. Abels

This black and white photograph shows Edwin F. Abels, (1892-1985). Abels born in Eudora, Kansas and a graduate of the University of Kansas began his newspaper career by joining the staff of the Parsons Sun in Chanute, Kansas. In 1923, he moved back to Lawrence, Kansas to became the editor and publisher of the Douglas County Republican, renamed the Lawrence Outlook. Actively involved in his community, Abels made a political bid in 1936 for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives. He successfully served six regular sessions and one special session as a Republican from the Twelve District. In 1948, Abels chose not to seek re-election, but continued to serve the Lawrence community through a number of social appointments. On April 22, 1985, Abels passed away at the age of ninety-three in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Albert G. Patrick

This is an engraving of Albert G. Patrick, who came to Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, on February 12, 1856. He became involved in the free-state party. Patrick joined Captain Wright's Stranger Creek company and participated in the Hickory Point engagement on September 14, 1856. He was captured by United States troops and sent to Lecompton where he was held by Governor Geary under indictment for murder. He was later acquitted. In the summer of 1857, he was elected clerk of the Supreme Court and, in the fall of that year, was elected to the Council of the first Free-state Legislature, serving two years. Although a free-state man, he was elected to the Senate under the Lecompton constitution. In 1867 he was elected to the legislature from Marshall County. Patrick moved to Jefferson County in 1868 and, in 1869, he was elected clerk of the county, serving two years. He owned and published the Valley Falls New Era newspaper.

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William Allen White

A photograph of (left to right) William Allen White, author and editor of the Emporia Gazette; Sallie White; Pearl Allen Murdock; and Victor Murdock. The latter was appointed to the United States House of Representatives from Kansas to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Chester I. Long. Murdock served from May 26, 1903 to March 3, 1915. He was also the editor of the Wichita Eagle.

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William Allen White

This is a photograph showing (left to right) William Allen White, author and editor of the Emporia Gazette; Sallie White; Pearl Allen Murdock and Victor Murdock. The latter was appointed to the United States House of Representatives from Kansas to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Chester I. Long. Murdock served from May 26, 1903 to March 3, 1915. He was the editor of the Wichita Eagle.

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William Allen White and President Theodore Roosevelt

This is a photograph of William Allen White and President Theodore Roosevelt at White's home in Emporia, Kansas. White was the long time editor of the Emporia Gazette.

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John Morgan Walden scrapbook

Walden, John Morgan, 1831-1914

J. M. Walden, a Methodist preacher, politician, and ardent Free-State man, was editor of the Quindaro Chindowan newspaper in Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, from 1857-1858. His two volume scrapbook includes newspaper clippings and notes on national and local politics. It focuses on the Popular Sovereignty issue that defined the creation of Kansas Territory and its efforts to achieve statehood, including many articles on the slavery question generally, abolitionism, the threat of secession, John C. Fremont, and the writing of the Kansas constitution. Many of the articles are from the Quindaro Chindowan.

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Josiah and Agnes B. Carlisle Miller

This sepia-colored image shows newspaper publisher and editor Josiah Miller and his wife, Agnes B. Carlisle Miller. The couple married on January 3, 1854, in Bloomington, Indiana, and later migrated to the territorial town of Lawrence, Kansas. A supporter of the abolitionist movement, Miller and his partner, Robert G. Elliott, established the Kansas Free State newspaper on January 5, 1855. It is considered to be one of the earliest papers in Kansas to write against the institution of slavery.

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Bits of history, Topeka Typographical Union No. 121

Topeka Typographical Union No. 121 (Kan.)

This document presents a brief history of the Topeka Typographical Union. Established in 1869, the Topeka Union gave up its charter in the 1870s (possibly 1876) but reorganized in 1882. This document summarizes some of the history and provides a list of members in 1874, 1886, delegates from 1870-1901 and a list of members in 1901.

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Secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen to George W. Jacobs

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

The secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, writes to Philadelphia publisher George Jacobs acknowledging receipt of a letter regarding the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. In October 1919, Jacobs had written to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suggesting the creation of a court system that would function much like the District and Federal Court system for the purpose of settling disputes between capital and labor.

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