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Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Law enforcement officers (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.

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Dr. H. C. Perdue's Neosho County Advertiser, Erie, Kansas

This pamphlet titled The Neosho County Advertiser was published by Dr. H. C. Perdue, M. D., in Erie, Kansas. It contains approximately 50 pages of descriptions of medical cures and other advertising. Descriptions of Dr. Perdue's Ague Cure and other medical treatments are on pages 2-28, and other advertisements are on pages 29-49, plus the inside and outside of the back cover. Besides information on Dr. Perdue's medical practice, there are numerous advertisements for drug stores. Drug stores listed in the advertisements (and their town locations, all in Kansas) include: Palace Drug Store, Erie; Ira Steinberger Drug Store, Erie; New City Drug Store, Erie; Dr. C. E. Steadman, Druggist, Osage Mission; I. N. Wherrett General Merchandise and Drugs, Vietsburg; M. Devine, Druggist, Osage Mission; Baldwin House Drug Store, Thayer; W. R. Kramer, Druggist, Chanute; John McCarthy, Druggist, Galesburg; and Mrs. Samuel Whelpley, Druggist, Morehead. Druggists listed as references for Dr. Perdue include Charles H. Eaton and J. T. Brown, both of Erie. Other businesses and professions advertised include attorneys, real estate agents, merchants, banks, doctors, clothing stores, millinery and dress making stores, grocery stores, jewelry stores, candy stores, cigar stores, meat markets, bakeries, livery stables, abstracters, tree nurseries, buggy harness stores, carpenters, hardware stores, fur dealers, barber shops, lumber companies, monument dealers, dry goods, dentists, hotels, and furniture stores.

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Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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Vern Miller and Brian Moline

Heinemann, David

A photograph showing Vern Miller, former Kansas Attorney General and Sedgwick County attorney and sheriff, and Brian Moline, an attorney, former chairman of the Kansas Corporation Commission and a Wichita state legislator. The photograph was taken at the Kansas State Historical Society's annual meeting.

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Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.

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Vern Miller

Rorabaugh & Millsap Studio

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Attorney General Vern Miller. A native of Wichita, Kansas, and a veteran of World War II, he began his career as sheriff of Sedgwick County, Kansas, (1964-1969). As sheriff, he enforced the law in a aggressive hands-on manner by putting himself in the same dangers that patrol officers faced. This style of law enforcement, quickly earned him the nickname "Supercop" and "Supersheriff". Miller's ambitions to effectively enforce Kansas laws, would elect him in 1970 as the first Democratic attorney general in over eighty years. During his tenure as attorney general, Miller's "supercop" mentality continued as he enforced the drug, alcohol, and gambling laws in the state. Miller's relentless efforts to up hold the law reelected him in 1972 when he carried all 105 counties. Before the close of his second term, Miller 's political career took a new direction with his candidacy for Kansas Governor. During the 1974 election, he campaign on the emphasis of law enforcement rather than the details of state government. In the end, Miller could not make the transition to governor, and lost to Republican candidate Robert Bennett. With the loss, Miller closed out his career as attorney general and returned to Wichita, Kansas, to practice law.

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Joseph B. Tomlinson

This black and white photograph shows Joseph B. Tomlinson, (1861-1922). Tomlinson, a native of Ohio, settled in Ottawa County, Kansas in 1881, to teach school and study law in the office of D.C. Chipman in Minneapolis, Kansas. He passed the bar, in 1890, and devoted his time and energy to up-holding the law and defending citizens' rights. In 1891, Kansas Governor William Stanley appointed Tomlinson warden of the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas. During his brief tenure as warden, Tomlinson successfully managed to keep over 280 convicts from striking in the penitentiary coal mines without violence or outside assistance. He resigned from the warden's position, in 1901, to return to private life. In 1903, he moved to Independence, Kansas.

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