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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 24 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Naismith and Forrest Claire (Phog) Allen

D'Ambra, Duke

Photograph of Dr. James Naismith and Forrest Claire (Phog) Allen holding a basketball at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Jess Willard

This sepia colored photograph shows Jess Willard, 1881-1968, defeating Jack Johnson, 1878-1946, in Havana, Cuba for the title of heavyweight champion of the world.

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Walter Johnson

This is a photograph of Walter Johnson, 1887-1946, as he appeared pitching for the Washington Senators baseball team at the peak of his career. Nicknamed "The Big Train" for the speed and power of his pitches, Johnson was born and raised on a farm near Humboldt, Kansas.

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Willard, Jess

A portrait of Jess Willard, (1888-1968), native of Pottawatomie County, Kansas, who became the world heavyweight boxing champion, on April 5, 1915, when he defeated defending champion Jack Johnson in a twenty-six round match in Havana, Cuba. The "Pottawatomie Giant" as Willard was know in the boxing world, had a career of twenty-five wins but was unable to defend his title to challenger Jack Dempsey on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. After the lost, Willard's boxing career came to a close and he pursued a new profession in movies and vaudeville shows. On December 15, 1968, Willard passed away at the age of eighty-six in Los Angeles, California.

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Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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Alfred Mossman Landon

This photograph shows Kansas Governor Alfred Mossman Landon fly fishing.

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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James Naismith

James Naismith invented the game of basketball. In 1891, while working as a physical education teacher at the YMCA International Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts, Naismith was asked to develop a game that would not take up much room, was not too rough, and at the same time, could be played indoors. Inspired by a game he played as a child in Canada called "Duck on a Rock," his game was first played on December 15, 1891, with thirteen rules (modified versions of twelve of those are still used today), a peach basket nailed to either end of the school's gymnasium, and two teams of nine players. On January 15, 1892, Naismith published the rules for basketball. The original rules did not include what is known today as the dribble, and only allowed the ball to be moved up or down the court via passes between players. Naismith moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1898, following his studies in Denver, to serve as a professor, and the school's first basketball coach, at the University of Kansas. The University of Kansas went on to develop one of the nation's most storied college basketball programs.

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Dwight David Eisenhower camping with a group of boys.

Dwight David Eisenhower is camping with a group of boys near Abilene, Kansas, in this photograph.

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Arthur Capper, Bethesda, Maryland

This portrait shows McGrew, Sharp, Marmell, and Capper, at the Burning Tree Golf Club in Bethesda, Maryland from the script at the bottom of the photograph. The men are dressed to play golf and are standing in front of an automobile. Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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