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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mennonite persecution now a forgotten chapter in state history

Hutchinson News

This article published in the Hutchinson News, details the difficulties German Americans, especially Mennonites, faced in Kansas during World War I.

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Anna M. Hogsett to Governor Payne Ratner

Hogsett, Anna

This letter from Mrs. Anna Hogsett of Brownell, Kansas, to Governor Payne Ratner, details her efforts to help her son Luther who refused to join the U.S. military because he objected to war of any kind. In addition, Mrs. Hogsett's letter is important because it details the stance of many Jehovah's Witnesses toward armed conflict and violence.

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Mennonites loyal

Topeka Journal

This article, published in the Topeka Journal, argues against claims that Mennonites support Germany and the Kaiser because they do not support violence of any type.

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Must not shift burden in fighting kaiserism

Topeka Capital

This article published in the Topeka Capital addresses the decision by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture to deny Kansas Mennonites status as Conscientious Objector exempting them from service in World War I. Included in the article is arguments by C. B. Schmidt who supports the granting of Conscientious Objector status to Mennonites.

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Preacher given coat of tar by strangers

Topeka Capital

This article printed in the Topeka Capital covers the tarring of German American pastor Reverend Gustav Gastrock of Lawrence, Kansas. Reverend Gastrock was tarred by three men who probably attacked him in response to his refusal to preach in English in support of the Liberty Loan campaign and the Red Cross.

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Religious views not a valid exemption claim

Topeka Capital

This article from the Topeka Capital details the efforts of Mennonites to receive an exemption from wartime service during World War I due to their religious views.

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Robert Heike to Arthur Capper

Heike, Robert J.

This letter from Robert Heike, Jr., pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lydia, Kansas, to Kansas Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, addresses the use of the German language during church services. Heike explains that the local War Committee has asked that church services conducted in German be stopped, and he would like to know if a federal law exists prohibiting services in languages other than English.

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A. J. Dyck to Arthur Capper

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

Reverend A. J. Dyck of the Hoffnungsau Mennonite Church, Inman, Kansas, wrote this letter to Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, Kansas, concerning the Third Liberty Loan drive and its impact on the German American community. Dyck explains that the members of his church have bought more than the amount of Liberty Loans required by the established quota in order to prove their loyalty and avoid harassment by "mobs." In addition, Dyck asks Capper if it would be acceptable for members of his church to donate to the Red Cross rather than providing money to support the war effort.

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Lutheran Church protests correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This correspondence is the result of, and in reaction to, accusations that Lutheran Churches in the U.S. were loyal to the Kaiser (German Emperor) because most of their congregation consists of German Americans. In one piece of the correspondence, Pastor W.T.Vogel of Humboldt, Kansas, writes to Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, and requests that Capper pass his letter and accompanying newspaper clipping to the Topeka newspapers for distribution. Governor Capper responds by assuring Vogel that he does not doubt the loyalty of members of the Lutheran Church.

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