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Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief -- National Kansas Committee (Remove)
Environment (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt

Finch, H.

This letter, written from Osawatomie by A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee, provided general information about the inhabitants of Osawatomie and neighboring areas. It included a list of about half of the settlers residing in Osawatomie at this time, including the four pro-slavery voters. Mr. Finch went into detail about the most fertile areas that would be excellent sites for free state settlements, and about the economic conditions and financial needs of the settlers.

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W. F. M. Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W.F.M. Arny, agent of the National Kansas Committee, continues to send Thaddeus Hyatt, president of this committee, copies of letters he had received from Kansas settlers. These letters describe the economic conditions resulting from the continued drought during 1860. The reports were submitted by Rev. J. W. Fox of Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; the "Committee on the Little Osage" of Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Dr. I. W. Robinson of Manhattan, Kansas Territory; and Joseph M. Todd and others of Greenwood Township in Greenwood County, Kansas Territory.

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A census of residents on Big Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This account identifies the names and origins of both free-state and pro-slavery settlers who lived on Big Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory. The account, presumably collected by Thaddeus Hyatt or some other member of the National Kansas Committee, begins with a brief description of the area, and mentions particular cases of settlers who had noteworthy experiences. Of the 25 pro-slavery residents identified, only two owned slaves.

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Marais des Cygnes census report

This census report lists the total number of residents along the Marais des Cygnes River, commencing at the state line, including free state residents, proslavery residents, and free state residents "in distress." It also contains brief accounts of specific individuals and information about the surrounding area, such as the availability of land claims.

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Thaddeus Hyatt to James Buchanan

Hyatt, Thaddeus

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the President of the United States in an effort to obtain assistance for the suffering inhabitants of Kansas. He described in detail the needs of the settlers, including their lack of adequate winter clothing and the scarcity of food. According to his personal observations, Hyatt concluded that the only options left to Kansas settlers were exodus or starvation. He also asked that all government lands be removed from the market, especially those in the New York Indian reserve.

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Letters from Thaddeus Hyatt. The Drouth in Kansas universal! The last crop gone! No buckwheat! No vegetables! No corn! No seed of any kind! No bread! No money! No Hope! What is to be done? (No. 3)

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, writes to the "New York Tribune" to make New Englanders aware of the destitution and suffering of settlers in Kansas Territory. Hyatt gives accounts of conditions in Americus and Emporia townships in Breckenridge County and also in Jackson County and Lawrence. The letter reports the condition of crops, cattle disease, etc. It contains similar information to other statements made by Kansas settlers during the drought of 1860.

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Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas. The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! (No. 1)

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This item is titled "Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas, The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, tries to dispel reports coming from Leavenworth that conditions in Kansas Territory were being exaggerated. He feels efforts to deny "the present deplorable condition of things" are motivated by economic concerns. Hyatt writes that they suffered because of the drought, not their own actions, and that the free North should aid them. The letter contains a great deal of emotional rhetoric. The letter was copied (by hand) by W. F. M. Arny. The last page of the letter describes its origins.

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James W. Randall to Thaddeus Hyatt

Randall, James W.

In this letter, James Randall of Emporia, Kansas, informed Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, of the drought?s effect on the neighboring population. Many families were destitute after the failure of the corn crop and were considering leaving their homes altogether. Randall hoped that Hyatt could send aid to the starving settlers.

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New England Kansas Aid committee, Aid for Kansas

This article declares that the New England Kansas Aid Committee has received generous contributions for the free state settlers in Kansas. It also mentions that since the immediate needs of the settlers have been cared for, the most urgent need now is for investments in land and labor.

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