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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

State Industrial School for Boys, Topeka, Kansas

This silent film documents the State Industrial School for Boys of Topeka, Kansas, in 1935 and depicts all aspects of the institution's educational, health, recreational, vocational and boarding programs. A segment of the film shows Governor Alfred M. Landon visiting the school and making a speech. The school opened in 1881 and sought to reform boys under the age of sixteen who had committed criminal acts. The school taught boys to be farmers, dairymen, tailors, carpenters, linemen, cobblers, barbers, cooks, waiters, machinists, and engineers.

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Samuel W. Greer, report

Greer, Samuel W

This printed report was submitted to the Kansas Territorial Legislature by Gov. Medary on January 4, 1860. S. W. Greer, the Territorial Superintendent of Common Schools reported that fifteen counties had submitted reports and schools were taught in 136 districts comprising 7,029 children. He reported on how he visited school districts and included some information on various types of schools in the state. He wrote that the pay for the superintendent was inadequate, due to the value of territorial scrip being worth 30 cents on the dollor. He indicated that he had to use $500 of his own funds in the past year. He wrote about the need to establish normal schools (for training teachers) and to hold teachers' institutes. He wanted to increase the standards for teacher qualifications. He also discussed various aspects of educational methodologies of the period. He included short reports from the following counties: Douglas, Anderson, Jackson, Nemaha, and Osage as well as some statistics from all organized counties. This report was taken from the Journal of the House of Representatives, Kansas Territory, 1859, pages 34 through 82.

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Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Memoirs of Charles Homer Dewey

Dewey, Charles Homer, 1885-1976

This item is a memoir of Charles Homer Dewey's life to 1943 and a postscript to 1944. Included are recollections of his life on the farm near Piedmont, Kansas; studies at the Kansas State Normal School (now Emporia State University); work as a teacher and school superintendent, the latter at Randolph and Grenola, Kansas; college and medical school at the University of Kansas; medical practice in Buffalo and Elk city, Kansas, during the Great Depression; and military service as a physician at Civilian Conservation Corps camps in Kansas, Missouri, and the western United States and a prisoner of war camp at Little Rock, Arkansas. The memoirs also describe farm life and the agricultural economy in the late 1880s and the political debate over the Spanish-American War.

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Dwight David Eisenhower, as a senior at Abilene High School

Dwight David Eisenhower appears in this photo as a senior at Abilene High School. The photo was copied from The Helianthus yearbook.

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Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas

Multiple scenes of Sherman County, Kansas.

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Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas

Multiple scenes of Sherman County, Kansas.

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John Christoph photograph album

This album contains photographs of Ellinwood and Barton County, Kansas, taken by John Christoph. On June 18, 1891, he opened a photography gallery in the north room of a furniture store and continued in the business until February 14, 1919. Christoph also served as the Ellinwood police judge for twenty years.

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