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Page 1 of 7, showing 10 records out of 62 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Resolution of the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference

This copy of a resolution, drafted by the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of Omaha City, Nebraska Territory, resolved to approve the efforts of the Trustees of Bluemont Cental College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to "erect a noble college edifice" and to support Isaac Goodnow's continuation as Agent.

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A local history of Jerome Township, Gove County, Kansas

Baker, Fred

This is a local history of Jerome Township, Gove County, Kansas, as recollected by Fred Baker, Gove City, Kansas. Baker wrote this sketch and submitted it in March 1918 to the Golden Belt Educational Association at Hays, Kansas, and was awarded a prize. Also included is a letter from Judge J.C. Ruppenthal, Russell, Kansas, to William Connelly, Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas, who received the sketch from Baker and wished for it to be donated into the Society's holdings.

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Six gun to 61

Kansas. Centennial Commission

This film by the Kansas Centennial Commission commemorates 100 years of Kansas statehood with an overview of Kansas history. The twenty-five minute film begins with the Louisiana Purchase and ends with President Eisenhower's speech in Abilene, Kansas, in 1959. The film was produced by the University of Kansas Television-Film Center with assistance from the Kansas Historical Society, and it was written and directed by Robert D. Brooks and J. William Walker.

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Carl A. Swensson

This black and white photograph shows Reverend Dr. Carl A. Swensson. He was the leader of the Swedish Lutheran Church and founder of Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas. The photograph was taken by Bror Gustaf Grondal in Lindsborg, Kansas.

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Lewis L. Dyche

This photograph shows Professor Lewis L. Dyche dressed in a fur outfit that he wore during the Peary party rescue mission. In this photograph, Dyche demonstrates how he harpooned a walrus during the rescue expedition. Professor Dyche was the head of the systematic zoology and taxidermy department at the University of Kansas from 1900 until his death in 1915.

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T. M. Eddy to the Officers of _____ R.R.

Eddy, T.M.

This letter written by T. M. Eddy, is an example of many letters of introduction written on the behalf of Isaac Goodnow. Goodnow, recently emigrated to Kansas Territory, was traveling extensively in the East in order to raise money for the construction of a new college in Manhattan. He succeeded in founding Bluemont College, which was a precursor to Kansas State University. Letters like these would have increased Goodnow's credibility when meeting new potential investors.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Quereau

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Kansas Territory to a friend Quereau of New England. It appeared that Goodnow was growing tired of the hard -scrabble life in the Territory, which was "decidedly injurious" to his constitution. He also showed signs of discouragement regarding the founding of a college in K.T., resigned to the idea that "for the time to come little can be done educationally." Goodnow told Quereau that he was actively seeking a teaching job back in the States.

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Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Denison, Henry

Henry Denison wrote from Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle Joseph Denison, a Trustee of the College. Henry informed him that dry summer conditions had significantly impeded crop growth. The drought also affected the construction of the College, as the plasterers depended on the water supply of a nearby creek to mix their plaster; carpenters, however, moved forward with their work. Henry closed with a mention of a recent eclipse.

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Pharmacy class at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

This photograph shows a pharmacy class at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. Dean Lucius E. Sayre, who founded and led the School of Pharmacy from 1885 to 1925, is seated fourth from the right. There are fourteen students visible in the class picture, including two women. Cases filled with bottles of chemicals and pharmacy supplies are visible in the background.

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Benjamin Franklin Mudge

Tintype portrait of Benjamin Franklin Mudge, 1817-1879, who was the first State Geologist of Kansas. In 1862, geologist Mudge was invited to deliver a series of lectures before the Kansas legislature. The body passed legislation to organize a state geological survey and decided to make Mudge the state geologist, "an honor," he said, "entirely unsought, yet thoroughly enjoyed." Mudge was elected professor of geology and associated sciences at the Kansas State Agricultural College. He published the first "Geology of Kansas," a 65-page report issued in 1866, and the first geological map of the state in 1875. Born in Maine in 1817, Mudge grew up in Massachusetts, attending academies there and graduating from Wesleyan University in Connecticut in 1840. Mudge studied natural science and history, but also completed the classical course and studied law. He was admitted to the bar and embarked on a political and legal career, but Mudge always maintained his interest in geology and natural history. During the summer of 1861, in order to demonstrate his antislavery convictions, Mudge moved his family to Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas, a bustling river town with a reputation as an important point on the Underground Railroad and as a stronghold of the free-state movement during the preceding years. After leaving the agricultural college in 1873, Mudge collected specimens for Yale University and was named geologist under the State Board of Agriculture. Mudge also was a founding member of the Kansas Natural History Society, which became the Kansas Academy of Science. Mudge, who gathered the nucleus of the college's mineral collection, was later remembered as a one of the foremost pioneer scientists of Kansas. A biographer said he was "outstanding not only as a great explorer and collector of geological and paleontological specimens," he was also "recognized as an enthusiastic and inspiring teacher and was highly esteemed by the people of the State."

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