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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 34 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles and George Sternberg

This photograph shows prominent Kansas paleontologists,( left to right), Charles H. Sternberg, 1850-1943, and his son, George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969. The Sternberg Museum of Natural History in Hays, Kansas, contains fossils collected by the Sternberg family.

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Seeding Hubbard squash, M.G. Lee's farm, Finney County, Kansas

Wolf, Henry L. 1850-1924

The photograph shows men and children seeding Hubbard squash on M.G. Lee's farm in Finney County, Kansas.

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Maude Elliott, School teacher, Finney County, Kansas

This photograph shows Maude Elliot shooting her handgun at a coyote that was too far away. She was able to hit him on the foot and he jumped high into the air and then fled. In her Maude Elliott explains how she had better luck hitting rattlesnakes. She was able to hit seven of them and the eighth she killed with the heel of her shoe. It was a small snake that had been slithering across the path of her front door.

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Dr. C.F. Menninger with his mineralogy collection

This is a photograph of Charles Frederick Menninger with his collection of rocks and books about mineralogy. This office was in the Arts and Crafts building in the East Campus of the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas.

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Fred Tainter's ranch in Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of Fred Tainter's chuckwagon with cowboys seated on the ground eating a meal. Also visible are horses and a herd of cattle in the background.

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Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Sedgwick County Marshal, looking at marijuana plants.

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Portheus Molossus fossil, Oakley, Kansas

This is a view of a fossilized fish at a school in Oakley, Kansas. The photograph is a reverse image and includes the hands and a leg of a man engaged in cleaning an area beneath the fossil's lower jaw. The man in the photo may be George F. Sternberg. The label on the fossil reads Portheus Molossus.

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George Sternberg and Myrl Walker

This photograph shows Kansas paleontologists George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969, and Myrl V. Walker, 1903-1985, at work on a site.

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Myrl Walker and George Sternberg

This photograph shows Kansas paleontologists Myrl V. Walker, 1903-1985, and George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969, examining the ground next to a parked truck.

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Benjamin Franklin Mudge

Tintype portrait of Benjamin Franklin Mudge, 1817-1879, who was the first State Geologist of Kansas. In 1862, geologist Mudge was invited to deliver a series of lectures before the Kansas legislature. The body passed legislation to organize a state geological survey and decided to make Mudge the state geologist, "an honor," he said, "entirely unsought, yet thoroughly enjoyed." Mudge was elected professor of geology and associated sciences at the Kansas State Agricultural College. He published the first "Geology of Kansas," a 65-page report issued in 1866, and the first geological map of the state in 1875. Born in Maine in 1817, Mudge grew up in Massachusetts, attending academies there and graduating from Wesleyan University in Connecticut in 1840. Mudge studied natural science and history, but also completed the classical course and studied law. He was admitted to the bar and embarked on a political and legal career, but Mudge always maintained his interest in geology and natural history. During the summer of 1861, in order to demonstrate his antislavery convictions, Mudge moved his family to Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas, a bustling river town with a reputation as an important point on the Underground Railroad and as a stronghold of the free-state movement during the preceding years. After leaving the agricultural college in 1873, Mudge collected specimens for Yale University and was named geologist under the State Board of Agriculture. Mudge also was a founding member of the Kansas Natural History Society, which became the Kansas Academy of Science. Mudge, who gathered the nucleus of the college's mineral collection, was later remembered as a one of the foremost pioneer scientists of Kansas. A biographer said he was "outstanding not only as a great explorer and collector of geological and paleontological specimens," he was also "recognized as an enthusiastic and inspiring teacher and was highly esteemed by the people of the State."

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