Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Environment (Remove)
Community Life -- Arts and Entertainment (Remove)
People (Remove)
Collections (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Princess Waconda

Herschel C. Logan

Salina artist Herschel Logan created this pen and ink drawing for a intended book about Waconda Springs. The drawing references a mythological character associated with the Waconda Springs in Mitchell County. According to legend, Waconda was the daughter of an Indian chief and fell in love with a warrior from an opposing tribe. Upon discovery of their relationship, the two jumped into the Springs and drowned. Their death imbued the springs with medicinal capabilities. Sometime after 1870 a sanitarium and water bottling company were constructed on the site and operated until 1964. That year, the Bureau of Reclamation began construction of the Waconda Lake reservoir, leading to the destruction of the springs and sanitarium. The artist, Herschel Logan worked as a graphic designer in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was associated with the Prairie Print Makers, a group of Midwestern artists that produced art in the 1930s.

previewthumb

Bison, Central Plains

Shipshee, Louis

Oil painting of bison by Louis ShipShee, a Potawatomi Indian chief and artist. ShipShee was born August 11, 1896, on the Potawatomi Reservation near Mayetta, Jackson County, Kansas. He was a self-taught artist, know throughout the United States and Europe. He was an instructor at Haskell Indian College from 1932 to 1938, and lived in Topeka from 1952 until his death on June 17, 1975. Provenance of the painting suggests that it was given to Alf Landon by the artist.

previewthumb

John William Gardiner diary

Gardiner, John William, 1851-1917

John William Gardiner was born in or near Platte City, Missouri, in 1851. In March 1855, Gardiner and his family moved to the future site of Winchester, Jefferson County, in the newly opened Kansas Territory. During 1875, he taught school and simultaneously took classes in Leavenworth to obtain his teaching certificate. Many of the diary entries describe his teaching, weather, the grasshopper plague, and extracurricular activities such as singing and visiting friends. A transcription prepared by the diary donor, Allen Gardiner, follows the diary images and includes a one page introduction. An uncorrected, searchable OCR file is available as "Text Version" below.

previewthumb

Drouthy Kansas

Worrall, Henry

This painting by Henry Worrall, completed in 1878, challenges the assumption that Kansas was part of the "Great American Desert." Although there had, indeed, been a severe drought during 1860, Worrall believed that Kansas did not deserve this harsh reputation. In the foreground, his painting depicts the bountiful harvests of grain, watermelon, and potatoes, while the background includes rain showers and a rainbow stretching across the horizon. Although Worrall was a very productive artist, "Drouthy Kansas" quickly became his most famous work.

previewthumb

Maude Josephine Mitchell

This black and white photograph shows artist Maude Josephine Mitchell, (1875-1957), standing before a painting in her upstairs studio at the family farm. The painting depicts the family homestead, "Big Four Ranch", located three miles east of Wabaunsee in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. Her father Captain William E. Mitchell built the home in 1856. He was a member of the Beecher Bible and Rifle Society. The home once served as a safe house for slaves during the Underground Railroad but today it is maintained as a private residence. Maude began formal art training at the New York State Normal College in Buffalo, NY. After graduation she returned to Kansas to teach in the Manhattan area before entering the Columbia University School of Art in New York. In 1900, she graduated from Columbia and continued her studies at the Art Student League in New York City. Maude also spent some time at an art colony in the Catskills concentrating on her technique for landscape painting. Around 1901, Maude was appointed supervisor of art in the Dubuque, Iowa, public school system. A year later she became an art instructor at the Wisconsin State Normal College in Patteville, Wisconsin, where she taught for thirteen years. In the 1920s she returned to Kansas to oversee the family farm. In the 1930s and 1940s, Maude became well known as a Kansas artist for painting the prairie and wheat fields of Wabaunsee and Pottawatomie counties. Her paintings were included in art exhibits in Topeka and in Kansas City. In addition to her painting, Maude played and composed on the piano three songs "Prairie Roads a Windin", "The Dance of Romance" and "Ridin' in the Rain". In her later years Maude designed the gateway for the Wabaunsee Township Cemetery. To her family and friends she was remembered as a wonderful hostess who welcomed everyone with open arms into her home. On October 15, 1957, Maude passed away after a brief illness at the age of eighty-two.

previewthumb

Kansas Hills

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing a house nestled among the hills. The artist said the scene was in the Milford, Kansas area. Kansas Hills was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

previewthumb

Tornado

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on paper woodcut showing a tornado moving through a farm yard. Tornado was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

previewthumb

Grangers versus hoppers

Henry Worrall, 1825-1902

This is a copy of a cartoon by Kansas artist Henry Worrall showing Kansas farmers (Grangers) battling grasshoppers. The National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry was originally founded with the idea of educating and connecting farmers within America. The first Grange was set up in Fredonia, New York. From there granges spread across the U.S., providing classes and social events to farmers. The first Kansas Grange was organized in 1872 at Hiawatha. Within a few years, more than 1,000 Granges claiming more than 30,000 members had been established across the state. Read more about the Grange in Kansapedia.

previewthumb

Victim of the Dust

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing a deserted farm house with dust piled against and around it. The artist described it as ?a composite of several sketches of the Dust Bowl days. Victim of the Dust was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

previewthumb

Snow

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on long fiber board paper woodcut of snow falling on a country house, by Herschel Logan. Logan, one of the Prairie Printmakers, executed this work in 1930. According to Logan, this was ?taken from an early photograph.? Logan was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and the family moved to Winfield, Kansas, shortly afterwards. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He worked as an advertising artist in Salina until his retirement in 1968. He moved to Santa Ana, California, where he died December 8, 1987.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|

Environment

Community Life -- Arts and Entertainment

People

Collections

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material