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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alysia Kysar to Governor Joan Finney

Kysar, Alysia

Alysia Kysar of Liberal, Kansas, writes Governor Joan Finney of Topeka concerning a water rights conflict at Cheyenne Bottoms wetlands in Barton County, Kansas. Kysar is eleven years old. She argues that the importance of wildlife habitats and communal ownership of natural resources, like water, supercede the rights of individual water users along Wet Walnut Creek. Kysar further questions the suitability of irrigated agriculture to an arid environment. In Wet Walnut Irrigators v. Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area (1992), the Kansas Supreme Court ruled in favor of Cheyenne Bottoms, citing its earlier claim to water rights.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, where hundreds of free state supporters were gathering for a Mass Convention on the 3rd and meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Cyrus reported that U. S. dragoons from Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley were camped around Topeka, since difficulty was expected. [In fact, U. S. and proslavery troops dispersed the free state legislature on the 4th.) Two companies of northern immigrants had been turned back at the Missouri River. Cyrus seemed skeptical that effective action would be taken against this outrage.

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Walter Pearce Hull photograph collection

Walter Pearce Hull, 1870-1956

This series of photographs was taken by Walter Pearce Hull. He was born November 22, 1870, in Eyota, Minnesota, grew up in Athens, Alabama, and moved to Kansas as a young man. His parents were Joseph Gould Hull, born May 4, 1840 in Orangeville, Ohio and Eliza Jane Westfall, born October 29, 1847 in Bushnell, Illinois. By 1894 he was manager of the Northrup Store in Colony. He served as a 1st Lt. In the 20th Kansas Infantry, U.S. Volunteers, 1898-99, during the Philippine-American War, serving on Frederick Funston's staff. He returned to Iola after he was discharged and was manager of the Northrup store there. Hull was a skilled amateur photographer. Many of the photos were taken while he was courting Lenna Myrtle Jolliffe, 1908-1909. They married December 22, 1909 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived at 420 S. Washington Street, Iola and had three children: Harriet, born September 29, 1910, Berrien Jolliffe, born October 15, 1913, and Lenna Doris, born December 3, 1915.

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History of Kansas and emigrant's guide

Chapman, J. Butler

The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery." Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 1

Babcock, Carmi W., 1830-1889

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 1, the place of election was the office of Dr. Charles Robinson in Lawrence. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the First District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, on the south bank of the Kansas River; thence along the south bank of said river to the first tributary or watered ravine running into the Kansas above the town of Lawrence, thence up that tributary to the head thereof; thence in a direct line to the west side of __Rolf's house; thence, by a due south line, to the Santa Fe Road; thence by the middle of said road to the Missouri State line; and thence by said State line to the place of beginning."

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

From Lawrence, K.T., where he went to lobby the territorial legislature on behalf of Sumner's city charter and a "Pikes Peak Express Company," John J. Ingalls wrote to tell his father about the journey that took him through Leavenworth. He made some interesting observations about the condition of the roads and the general discomfort involved in overland travel ("The coaches are constructed with special reference to safety in passing over corduroy roads, through sloughs and ravines, having no regard whatever to the comfort of the passengers."), as well as nice descriptions of both cities, Leavenworth and Lawrence.

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Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917

This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

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Orville Chester Brown, business card

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

This business card for Orville C. Brown, "agent for the town of Osawatomie, Kansas Territory," accompaned a list of the advantages of settling in Kansas Territory and the city of Osawatomie. A hand written note on the list indicated it was issued by O. C. Brown. The printed circular described the soil, available building materials, wood, produce and opportunities for acquiring land. It also gave the price of various livestock. The business card noted that Brown also was involved in locating land warrants and purchasing and selling claims.

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