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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, reelected on the 6th for a third six-month term as president of the Topeka Town Association, wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He had been appointed to visit Washington by the Free State Executive Committee and nominated for territorial Secretary of State (losing in the January 15th election). Cyrus had received the money drafts Mary sent. He reported cold, stormy weather.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson?s role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown?s violent actions; while he deemed them ?reckless and hopeless,? he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown?s own religious beliefs and the violence of ?the slave power".

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote on a stormy day in Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Mary was finally to leave for K. T. on May 1st, provided Cyrus did not come to Meadville before she left. He suggested that she travel with Mr. Randolph, Mr. Thickstun, or Mrs. Nichols. He also requested money drafts drawn from well known banks to ease selling them.

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Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917

This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

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John S. Brown to William Brown

Brown, John S.

This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described living conditions in Topeka. Holliday expressed his intent to write to Mr. McFarland and his thanks for letters recently received. He mentioned Samuel Y. Lum, a Congregational minister, who was sleeping in his cabin. He also mentioned his presidency with the Topeka Town Association, agency with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and his own business. Finally, Holliday expressed hopes of a sawmill and referred to the possibility of trouble with Missourians. A few lines have been cut and removed from the lower part of pages 7 and 8.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Kansas Territory, to her husband, Isaac, who was traveling in Boston. Ellen asked that he purchase winter supplies for the family and neighbors while he was on the East Coast, and listed their necessities. The letter includes a short note from Joseph Denison, informing Isaac that more money was needed than expected to support the college through the winter.

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