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Curriculum -- The Kansas Journey (Remove)
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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 22 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Circular of the State Impartial Suffrage Association

This circular describes the efforts to secure suffrage for blacks and women in the state of Kansas. The flyer indicates the Henry B. Blackwell of New York and Mrs. Lucy Stone were traveling in Kansas at that time. The Association was being organized in 1867. S. N. Wood was the corresponding secretary for the association. There is a hand written note on the back from H. C. Whitney, Lawrence, Kansas, indicating his willingness to speak for the group.

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Birger Sandzen

This is an informal portrait of artist Birger Sandzen, 1871-1954, seated in his Lindsborg, Kansas, study with samples of his artwork and art collection.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Langston Hughes

Photograph of Langston Hughes copied from the Shawnee County Historical Society, Bulletin #47.

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Drouthy Kansas

Worrall, Henry

This painting by Henry Worrall, completed in 1878, challenges the assumption that Kansas was part of the "Great American Desert." Although there had, indeed, been a severe drought during 1860, Worrall believed that Kansas did not deserve this harsh reputation. In the foreground, his painting depicts the bountiful harvests of grain, watermelon, and potatoes, while the background includes rain showers and a rainbow stretching across the horizon. Although Worrall was a very productive artist, "Drouthy Kansas" quickly became his most famous work.

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Hockaday Motor Cycle Company

Business advertisement contained in the Automobile Club of Wichita's "Year Book" for 1909 to 1910. "Woody" Hockaday, a automobile dealer from Wichita, launched a campaign to mark Kansas auto routes. Later in 1918, he published a road map showing 33 marked highways in the United States.

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Carry Nation poster

F. M. Steves & Sons Printers

Large, rectangular color poster advertising an appearance by Carry Nation, a temperance advocate who gained notoriety by attacking saloons. Her activities began in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1899. A hatchet was her symbol because she often used the tool to smash saloon fixtures. In Nation?s autobiography, The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, she explained the genesis of this poster. While jailed in Topeka for smashing saloon fixtures in July 1901, Nation received a letter from James Furlong, manager of the Lyceum Theater in Rochester, New York. According to Nation, Furlong offered to bail her out of jail if she granted him some lecture dates. She agreed, was pardoned, and left almost immediately for a Chautauqua in Clarksburg, Ohio. Her lecture series continued across upstate New York.

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Walter Johnson

This is a photograph of Walter Johnson, 1887-1946, as he appeared pitching for the Washington Senators baseball team at the peak of his career. Nicknamed "The Big Train" for the speed and power of his pitches, Johnson was born and raised on a farm near Humboldt, Kansas.

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William Inge

A portrait of playwright William Motter Inge, 1913-1973. Born in Independence, Kansas, Inge graduated from the University of Kansas, worked for a Wichita radio station, and taught in both high school and college. His play "Come Back, Little Sheba" brought him fame in 1949. In 1953, the play "Picnic" won a Pulitzer Prize and in 1955, "Bus Stop" received rave reviews. Inge drew upon his Kansas background for the characters and storylines in his plays.

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

On January 25, 1859, free state activists Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence, and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, he was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay, and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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