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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 17 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles and George Sternberg

This photograph shows prominent Kansas paleontologists,( left to right), Charles H. Sternberg, 1850-1943, and his son, George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969. The Sternberg Museum of Natural History in Hays, Kansas, contains fossils collected by the Sternberg family.

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Missouri Fur Company records

Missouri Fur Company

This ledger is part of the papers of William Clark, president of the Board of Directors for the Missouri Fur Company, discovered with the records of the U. S. Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency (Volume 30). The Missouri Fur Company explored the Missouri River region and traded with several Indian tribes. Included are the "Articles of Association of the Missouri Fur Company," dated January 24, 1812, and the meeting minutes and accounts payable/receivable of the Board of Directors. The ledger also contains the signatures of William Clark, Manuel Lisa and several members of the Chouteau family of St. Louis.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Maude Elliott, School teacher, Finney County, Kansas

This photograph shows Maude Elliot shooting her handgun at a coyote that was too far away. She was able to hit him on the foot and he jumped high into the air and then fled. In her Maude Elliott explains how she had better luck hitting rattlesnakes. She was able to hit seven of them and the eighth she killed with the heel of her shoe. It was a small snake that had been slithering across the path of her front door.

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Portheus Molossus fossil, Oakley, Kansas

This is a view of a fossilized fish at a school in Oakley, Kansas. The photograph is a reverse image and includes the hands and a leg of a man engaged in cleaning an area beneath the fossil's lower jaw. The man in the photo may be George F. Sternberg. The label on the fossil reads Portheus Molossus.

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George Sternberg and Myrl Walker

This photograph shows Kansas paleontologists George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969, and Myrl V. Walker, 1903-1985, at work on a site.

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Memorandum of trip from Topeka, Kansas, to the Indian Country

Johnson, Gustaf, 1826-1886

These excerpts from Gus Johnson?s journal record his experiences as a member of the 19th Kansas Cavalry, Company G. The entries are dated from November 12, 1868 to November 26, 1868. Johnson records the movements and activities of his company in addition to the local wildlife (particularly bison), the weather, and the landscape. Johnson?s company also had some skirmishes with Indians.

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Myrl Walker and George Sternberg

This photograph shows Kansas paleontologists Myrl V. Walker, 1903-1985, and George F. Sternberg, 1883-1969, examining the ground next to a parked truck.

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"The End, 1883"

Garretson, M.S.

This ink on paper drawing by Martin Garretson depicts the artist's conception of the changes in western Kansas as the open prairie was claimed for family farms. By 1883, the vast buffalo herds of the central plains had been hunted almost to the point of extinction. In the drawing, one man is shown loading bleached buffalo bones into an oxen-drawn wagon, while another man with a horse-drawn plow has begun plowing the cleared prairie for a farm crop. A young girl and boy are shown with piles of horns and horned skulls, and a woman is shown standing in the doorway of a small farmhouse in the background.

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Leigh R. Webber to Senorita Morena (Miss Brown)

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Riley, Kansas, addressed to "Senorita Morena," or Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber first praises Fort Riley and describes the surrounding landscape. He goes on to describe fort life, including equipment and food. He also discusses his thoughts on the troops' future plans to march to New Mexico and his efforts to learn Spanish.

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