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Government and Politics (Remove)
People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
Date -- 1900s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Frank H. Doster, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1897-1903

Portrait of Frank H. Doster (b. 1847, d. 1933), who served as the Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1897 to 1903. He was part of the Populist movement in Kansas and later became a socialist.

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Samuel Austin Kingman

Portrait of Samuel Austin Kingman, Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1861-1865 and Chief Justice, 1867-1876.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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William Eugene Stanley

This sepia colored photograph shows William Eugene Stanley (front row wearing a dark suit) during military maneuvers for the Kansas National Guard in Ft. Riley, Kansas. Stanley entered public office in 1871. In 1898, he was elected as the fifteenth governor of Kansas, a position he held until 1903. Afterwards, he returned to Wichita, Kansas to practice law.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas, in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874-1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas, and to practice law. On October 13, 1910, William Eugene Stanley passed away at the age of sixty-six. He was later buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

Baldwin, Fred

These two cabinet cards show William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney from 1871 to 1872. A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney from 1874 to 1880. In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district from 1881 to 1883. Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas and was re-elected in 1901. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law.

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