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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Spirit of Washington, Washington School, Topeka, Kansas

Thompson, Joseph A.

This silent film documents a day at Washington School, a Black elementary school located at 1025 Washington, Topeka, Kansas. The film follows each grade level through various activities throughout the day. Washington was one of four Black elementary schools in Topeka prior to the the U. S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education (1954) that called for the desegregation of public schools.

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Major problem in Kansas--negro teachers hit by desegregation

Murphy, Anna Mary

This article describes how the desegregation of schools in the wake of the Brown v. Board of Education case would affect black schoolteachers across Kansas. The author gives the example of Topeka where, when the school board began desegregating schools prior to the final decision in the Brown case, black teachers lost their jobs. Although the school board wanted to ?avoid any disruption of the professional life of career teachers,? many schools were hesitant to place black teachers in classrooms containing both white and black students. Members of the black community who had opposed the Brown v. Board case at the local level had feared that integration would apply only to students, not to teachers, and it appeared to some that this would in fact be the case.

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Samuel W. Greer, report

Greer, Samuel W

This printed report was submitted to the Kansas Territorial Legislature by Gov. Medary on January 4, 1860. S. W. Greer, the Territorial Superintendent of Common Schools reported that fifteen counties had submitted reports and schools were taught in 136 districts comprising 7,029 children. He reported on how he visited school districts and included some information on various types of schools in the state. He wrote that the pay for the superintendent was inadequate, due to the value of territorial scrip being worth 30 cents on the dollor. He indicated that he had to use $500 of his own funds in the past year. He wrote about the need to establish normal schools (for training teachers) and to hold teachers' institutes. He wanted to increase the standards for teacher qualifications. He also discussed various aspects of educational methodologies of the period. He included short reports from the following counties: Douglas, Anderson, Jackson, Nemaha, and Osage as well as some statistics from all organized counties. This report was taken from the Journal of the House of Representatives, Kansas Territory, 1859, pages 34 through 82.

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Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Edwards

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

Orville C. Brown wrote this letter from Osawatomie to Mr. Edwards, regarding a shipment of school books. He also wrote concerning a common school in the area that would begin classes in May, taught by a Mr. Martin. Brown also mentioned, rather briefly, the needs of the Osawatomie community, including such skilled workers as blacksmiths and carpenters.

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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Thomas L. McKenney to James Barbour

McKenney, Thomas Loraine, 1785-1859

Thomas McKenney, the current Superintendent of Indian Affairs, wrote this letter to James Barbour, Secretary of War, explaining the perceived success of the government?s attempts to ?civilize? Indian tribes. As part of this process of ?civilization,? the government believed that it was necessary for native groups to become assimilated into white American society by adopting white agricultural methods, Christianity, and other elements of European American culture. Thomas McKenney was a passionate proponent of this system, and so he included a transcription of a letter written by a Cherokee man named David Brown who describes how his people had adopted Christianity, a republican form of government, and other elements of white culture. According to McKenney, as well as many other white Americans during this time period, the ?civilization? process had a positive effect on Native Americans. McKenney also advocated Indian removal, writing that ?should they retain their present location [within the United States] they will, in the course of a few years, be lost as a race.?

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Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war

Bull, Floyd R.

In this reminiscence, Floyd R. Bull, a member of the El Dorado company of the Kansas National Guard, recalls his involvment in the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, violence broke out between the competing legislative houses--the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House--prompting Populist Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to call the National Guard to the capitol. On February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war." This reminiscence is a copy of an earlier statement by Bull, written in 1938.

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