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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 14 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Gasper Christopher Clemens

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life whom were believed to be falsely accused or denied their personal rights. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One of those positions was legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling, and the other as court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and to organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After his defeat, Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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Mary Elizabeth Lease

Hardin & Ostergren

This is a portrait of Mary Elizabeth Lease, 1853-1933, a lawyer, orator, and supporter of the Populist Party.

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Gaspar Christopher Clemens

Downing, George

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One was as legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling and the other as a court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man, prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After the defeat Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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William Agnew Johnston

Leonard, J. H.

Portrait of William Agnew Johnston, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1903-1935.

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Susanna Madora Salter, Mayor of Argonia

Portrait of Susanna Madora Salter, Mayor of Argonia, and first woman mayor in the United States. Born March 2, 1860, in Belmont County, Ohio, Susanna Madora Kinsey moved to a Kansas farm with her parents in 1872. Eight years later, while attending the Kansas State Agricultural College, she met and married Lewis Salter. The couple soon moved to Argonia where she cared for their young children and became an officer in the local Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Nominated on the Prohibition Party ticket by several Argonia men as a joke, Salter surprised the group and received two-thirds of the votes. She was elected in April 4, 1887, just weeks after Kansas women had gained the right to vote in city elections. The 27-year-old woman knew more about politics than her detractors realized. She was the daughter of the town's first mayor. Her father-in-law, Melville J. Salter, was a former Kansas lieutenant governor. Although she apparently performed her job well, Salter never sought another elected office. Within a few years, the Salters moved to Oklahoma where the nation's first woman mayor died in 1961 at the age of 101.

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Lyman Underwood Humphrey

Leonard, J. H.

This cabinet card represents Lyman Underwood Humphrey,1844-1915. He served as state senator from Independence, Kansas from 1885 to 1887, and then as governor of Kansas from January 14, 1889 to January 9, 1893.

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Jeremiah ("Sockless Jerry") Simpson

Jerry Simpson in an 1892 debate with Chester I. Long for the seat in United States House of Representatives. Simpson debated Long at Harper, Kansas.

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John Whitnah Leedy house, Leroy, Kansas

This photograph represents the John Whitnah Leedy house in Leroy, Kansas. John W. Leedy was a Populist State Senator from 1893 to 1897, and Kansas Governor from 1897 to 1899. Standing at the left of the photograph is the eldest child of John W. and Sarah Leedy, Clara Romaine. To Clara's right in Margaret Amos, mother of John W. Beside her, is Sarah Leedy standing with her husband John W. and the Leedy's only son Boyd.

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