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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 48 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Barclay (Bat) Masterson

Photograph of William Barclay (Bat) Masterson who was raised in Wichita, Kansas. Masterson was deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A portrait of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A photograph of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Edward J. Masterson

A formal portrait of Dodge City, Kansas, marshall Edward J. Masterson (1852-1878), older brother of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Marshall Ed Masterson was killed in a gunfight on April 9, 1878, in Dodge City from a chest wound he received while attempting to disarm drunken cowboy, Jack Wagner.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok to Polly Butler Hickok

Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876

Letter written by James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, from someplace in Kansas, to Polly Butler Hickok, Troy Grove, Illinois. He complains that he has received few letters from her. Hickok will not tell his mother what he is doing in Kansas, but he offers to tell her later. He writes that the "excitement" is pretty much over, and he has seen some sights that would make one sick.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

During a lull, Cyrus K. Holliday reported from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania that Colonel Edwin V. Sumner had forced proslavery troops back to Missouri and camped on the border. Two free state men from Wisconsin had killed proslavery supporters near Osawatomie. Governor Wilson Shannon had resigned. A "large mass convention" was planned for July 2nd and 3rd, with a meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th. Cyrus advised Mary and Mr. Nichols to wait until after the 4th to travel to the territory.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok to Lydia Hickok

Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876

James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, [Monticello?, Kansas Territory] to his sister Lydia Hickok, Troy Grove, Illinois. He is disappointed to have not received many letters upon his arrival. Hickok has written to many acquaintances but received few letters. He gives regards to friends, especially certain women; wishes he had a photograph of Hannah Edwards. He tells of having seen [James A.] Harvey, a captain of "abolition trators" [sic].

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James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

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