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Page 1 of 35, showing 10 records out of 344 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, 1810-1885. Nichols and her husband settled in Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, where she was active in politics and women's rights. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859, where she secured for Kansas women liberal property rights, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."

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Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Jeremiah Simpson, United States Representative from Kansas

Bell, C. M.

Portrait of Jeremiah "Sockless Jerry" Simpson, Populist, United States Representative from Kansas, 1897-1899.

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Eli Thayer

Tucker, E. S.

Portrait of Eli Thayer, 1819-1899, who in 1853-54 was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature, and while there, originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company. He worked to combine the northern states in support of his plan to send antislavery settlers into Kansas. Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, and Ossawatomie, Kansas, were settled under the auspices of his company.

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Eli Thayer

Portrait of Eli Thayer, 1819-1899, who in 1853-54 was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature and while there, originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company. He worked to combine the northern states in support of his plan to send antislavery settlers into Kansas. Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, and Ossawatomie, Kansas, were settled under the auspices of his company.

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Jonathan Finch to William Barnes

Finch, writing from Coveville, New York, to William Barnes, secretary of the New York Kansas Committee, expresses his desire to settle in Kansas to take part in the "struggle for Liberty." Finch indicates that participation in the antislavery cause was his primary reason for his interest in emigrating to Kansas.

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George H. Hodges

This campaign billboard urges for the reelection of Governor George Hartshorn Hodges, 1866-1947. Hodges as Kansas governor for one term from 1913 to 1915.

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Charles Sumner

Portrait of Charles Sumner, U. S. Senator from Massachusetts. He delivered the speech that later became known by the title "The Crime Against Kansas".

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Mary Elizabeth Lease

Deane

Mary Elizabeth (Clyens) Lease is perhaps the best-known Kansas Populist. She was born in Pennsylvania on September 11, 1850 to Irish immigrants. At the age of twenty she moved to Osage Mission, Kansas, in order to teach school at St. Anne?s Academy. While there, she met and married Charles L. Lease, a local pharmacist. After several unsuccessful attempts at farming, Lease turned her attention to the plight of her fellow farmers, and by 1890, her passionate criticisms of railroads and big business made her a formidable force in the newly formed People's (Populist) Party. She became a well-known lecturer for the Populist cause, traveling throughout the West, Midwest, and South. Although this statement has in fact been misattributed to her, she is most known for her assertion that farmers must "raise less corn and more hell.? Her zeal and refusal to compromise eventually alienated her from mainstream Populists, and by 1896 she had turned her attention toward other reform causes, including prohibition and suffrage. She divorced Charles in 1902, spending the remainder of her life living with various children on the Atlantic coast. She passed away on October 29, 1933 in New York state.

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Jeremiah "Sockless Jerry" Simpson

Jeremiah Simpson was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, on March 31, 1842. Simpson and his family relocated to New York State when he was six, and during the Civil War he served in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry, receiving a discharge due to medical reasons. When the war was over, he moved to Indiana and then to Kansas, working as a farmer and cattle rancher. Then, after devastating financial losses, Simpson began his political career by running as a Union Labor Party candidate for the state legislature in 1886 and 1888. Although he lost both of these elections, Simpson rose to the occasion when, in 1889, the newly formed People?s (Populist) Party nominated him for Congress. In that election Simpson ran against James R. Hallowell, a Republican attorney who Simpson derided as a wearer of ?fine silk hosiery?; Hallowell responded by stating that fine hosiery was better than being sockless. This is how Simpson received the nickname ?sockless Jerry.? Simpson won the election and a seat in the House of Representatives, going on to serve three terms from 1891 to 1895, and again from 1897 until 1899. He died on October 23, 1905.

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