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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 19 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William L. Sayers in Hill City, Kansas

These two photographs show William L. Sayers, an attorney, in his office in Hill City, Kansas. Sayers was born around 1872 in Nebraska and moved to Hill City, Kansas, with his family in 1888. There at the age of 15 he earned a teaching certificate, however, he had to wait until he turned 16 to teach. After teaching school for several years, he became clerk of the court for Graham County. Sayers used his spare time to read law books. In 1893, he was admitted to the bar and took classes at the University of Kansas. Although he never graduated from law school, he was elected county attorney for Graham county in 1900, 1912, and 1914. His younger brother John followed him in this position in 1918. He was the second African American to be elected Graham County Attorney; the first was G. W. Jones who was elected in 1896. The Sayers brothers practiced law in Graham County for their entire careers.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of 73, Usher died at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.

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Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States

Portrait of Charles Curtis, 1860-1936, United States Congressman, 1893-1907, U. S. Senator, 1907-1913 and 1915-1929, and Vice President of the United States, 1929-1933.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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Governor Payne Harry Ratner

This portrait represents Payne Harry Ratner. Ratner was the first resident of Labette County to be elected as County Attorney, holding office from 1923 to 1927. After serving as County Attorney, he went on to serve in the Kansas State Senate from 1929 to 1939, and then later served two terms as Kansas Governor from 1939 to 1943. Notable programs during his administration was implementing a teachers? pension plan and a state employee merit system.

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Governor Robert Frederick Bennett

This black and white photograph shows Robert Frederick Bennett, (1927-2000). He was first elected to public office, in 1955, as a council member for the City of Prairie Village and later the mayor of the city from 1957 to 1965. Bennett successfully ran on the Republican ticket for a seat in the Kansas Senate, (1965 to 1974). He later served as president of the senate from, (1973 to 1974). In 1974, he was elected the thirty-ninth Governor of Kansas, (1975-1979). Bennett is remembered for being an eloquent speaker. He passed away on October 9, 2000 at the age of seventy-three.

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Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white engraving shows John Palmer Usher, (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879-1881). On April 13, 1889 at the age of seventy-three, he passed away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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