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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 19 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Harry Walter Colmery, American Legion Commander, speaking at the dedication of the Flanders Field Chapel, Waeregham, Belgium.

American Battle Monuments Commission

This is a photograph of Harry Walter Colmey, American Legion National Commander, speaking at the dedication of the Flanders Field Chapel, Waeregham, Belgium, August 8, 1937. It was copied from Dedications American War Memorials In Europe, 1937.

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Harry Walter Colmery, as a young man.

This is a photographic portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The portrait of Colmery was taken as a young man.

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Harry Walter Colmery with his wife Minerva and children

Harry W. Colmery, his wife Minerva (Mina), and their children Harry Jr., Mary, and Sarah are standing by a car.

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Harry Walter Colmery

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery (1890-1979) dressed in his World War I uniform. Colmery was an attorney in Topeka, Kansas, an American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights.

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Harry Walter Colmery

Allen Studios

This is a photograph of Harry Walter Colmery taken later in life.

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75,000 Legionnaires capture New York

Illustrated Current News, Inc.

These are picturegrams from the American Legion Convention in New York in 1952. "As some 3 million New Yorkers cheer their lagging footsteps, the delegates to the American Legion Convention, West Point Cadets, many bands, etc., parade on Fifth Ave. for 9 1/2 hours." 1. A zany 'Leapin Lena' gives the crowd a lot of laughs. 2. Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Harry W. Colmery, march with the Kansas delegation. 3. Claude Buzich, Minneapolis, gives a reluctant policeman a great big kiss.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chawick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, to tell him that it appeared favorable that Hill would win possession of the land disputed by Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. However, Chadwick feared that the decision may not be made as easily as he had earlier anticipated, since Robert Lawrence had been seen in Leavenworth and had not traveled to Washington to work with Nathaniel Causin. Nonetheless, Abelard Guthrie had given up trying to obtain the land as well, leaving Hiram as the only other claimant.

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