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Page 1 of 8, showing 10 records out of 79 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Dental care, Kansas City, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

A young boy getting his teeth cleaned by a dentist in Kansas City, Kansas. This service was provided by the Works Progress Administration's domestic science and food project.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, concerning several 40 acre lots which were marked off shortly before Samuel N. Simpson left town. It appeared to Chadwick that those Simpson had purchased were purchased on the behalf of absentee investors, such as Hill, even though they had not been divided or designated in the name of any others. Chadwick presumed that Abelard Guthrie would allow Hill to have the land he thought was being purchased in his name upon payment to the Town Company. Chadwick also reported that prices of land were staying up in Quindaro, and that business development continued.

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton predicted a good property market for the coming spring, despite the "hard money matters" which had been the situation during the winter. He reported that the Shawnee lands would open soon, to have them paid for by the end of the summer, and that Hill's land investments in Manhattan were "in good standing". Morton added that Samuel Simpson has been busy lately, traveling back and forth from Quindaro to Lawrence.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal

Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913

The Leavenworth constitution was the third of four constitutions proposed for Kansas statehood and the second free-state constitution (after the Topeka and before the Wyandotte constitutions). Delegates for the territory's third constitutional convention were elected on March 9 and assembled in Leavenworth on March 25, 1858. The delegates considered the "Homestead Exemption" during the morning session, April 1, 1858. The provision was amended so as to make the basic exemption 160 acres or not over $2,000. The vote on this was recorded and the yeas and nays are followed by numerous explanations--many delegates who voted nay did so not because they opposed the concept.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Henry Woods to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Woods, Henry

Henry Woods, member of the Township Meetings and Speakers committee of the Fremont Club, asked Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, give an address that evening in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Holliday had returned to his home state to speak on behalf of Republican presidential nominee John Charles Fremont, who supported the free state cause. Woods' brief letter was written on the back of a printed list of subcommittees of the Fremont County Executive Committee. Evidentially, Woods had enclosed with the letter a note from G. E. Appleton of Birmingham, which requested that Holliday speak there the following day.

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